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List of illustrations

  • Olmec jade mask
  • Diagram of human brain
  • Pottery vessel
  • Stelae E and A
  • Palaeolithic migrations at north polar ice cap
  • Periodization for Mesoamerica
  • Periodization for the Andes
  • Andean chronology
  • Andean chronology
  • Tenochtitlan, plan c. 1510 showing relation of the Aztec capital to the present center of Mexico City
  • Codex Magliabechiano: Designs of Aztec cotton mantles
  • Relación de Michoacán: Indian illustration of Purépeche history
  • Codex Tudela: Indian costumes
  • Codex Tudela: Indian costumes
  • Florentine Codex: Indian stone masons at the quarry
  • Landa's Maya alphabet
  • Book of the Gods and Rites: Human sacrifice
  • Franciscan church
  • Cathedral
  • Rhetorica christiana: Indian temple
  • Indian temple
  • The Andean world
  • Map of Chalco Amecameca
  • Illustrations of Amerindian hammock and fire drill
  • School for girls, including Indians
  • Mitla: Hall of the Columns
  • Drawing of relief at Palenque
  • Geometric relief of Mitla style
  • View of Cholula
  • Outline drawings of the statue of Coatlicue
  • Statue of Coatlicue
  • Tula: Plan of excavations
  • Palenque: Palace plan
  • Statues, called Chac Mool
  • Graph plotting time in relation to human growth
  • Graph relating time to social evolution
  • Graph of arts in relation to human societies
  • Graph of lithic techniques related to social organization
  • Panoramic drawing of the Grand Canyon
  • Panorama of Teotihuacán
  • Castillo at Chichén Itzá
  • Pottery bowl at Ticul
  • Drawing of a Maya bowl "from near Peto"
  • Diagram of cultural horizons by area and date
  • Danzantes carvings
  • The Beach in Samur
  • Chart of relations among early Mexican clay figurine types
  • Mochica stirrup-spout vessel
  • Palenque: Palace, House E. West hall, mural cartouche paintings
  • Codex Borgia, fol. 18
  • Codex Fejérváry-Mayer, fol. 27
  • Jaguar-vessel for blood sacrifices
  • Large cylindrical vessel
  • Atzcapotzalco (Valley of Mexico): Strata containing pottery sequence pre-Classic to Conquest
  • Teotihuacán figurines, periods I–V
Free
Description: Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
Table of Contents
PublisherYale University Press
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00046.001
Free
Description: Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
Illustrations
PublisherYale University Press
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00046.002
Free
Description: Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
THE PURPOSE OF THIS WORK is to find how ancient American objects of esthetic value in the visual order have been considered since the Discovery by Columbus. Writers about ancient America are here selected for their ways of evaluating such products, rather than for their conclusions about them. The different bases for the gathering of data about the New World are defined. …
PublisherYale University Press
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00046.003
Free
Description: Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
WORK began in 1983 with retirement from teaching to continuing appointment at Yale University as Senior Research Scholar. Much of the writing was done at the Center for Advanced Visual Study at the National Gallery in Washington as Kress Professor (1985–86). …
PublisherYale University Press
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00046.004
Description: Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
WAYS OF WRITING a history of art are as various as the generations since Pliny the Elder. Yet the main topics—architecture, sculpture, painting—remain the same, and they include every craft. Local changes from century to century seem to be morphological, and from culture to culture they seem ideological. …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.1-11
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00046.005

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Description: Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
AT THE HOMINID beginning of the stone-tool series “activities for activities’ sake” appeared, including “play, curiosity, self-expression, investigation,” without “ulterior motives” but driven by “surplus nervous energy.” Other behavior emerged among early primates as “animal art” in courtship displays, nesting, and territorial markers in sound and space. …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.12-40
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00046.006

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Description: Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
TO APPROACH THE GENERAL historiography of New World events before Columbus as to their esthetic valuation, it is necessary to review surviving efforts before 1700 to salvage American antiquity, beginning with Columbus. Early scholars of the subject follow, who at first were European and only later of Amerindian origin. Most of the former were friars and priests, but only one of the Indian group, Diego Valadés (whose mother is thought to be Tlaxcalan), was allowed to be of religious profession as …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.41-83
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00046.007

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Description: Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
THE TITLE OF THIS CHAPTER refers to the idealist philosophical method of considering “values” as resident in speculation about absolute ideas of good, truth, and beauty during the European Enlightenment. Its fierce critic in this century was Antonello Gerbi. …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.84-108
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00046.008

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Description: Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
TO ENTER THE WORLD of esthetics from below is to examine the experimental psychologies of the mid-nineteenth century as well as the theories of Darwin and Marx and of some natural scientists. The idea of “esthetics from below” first became current in Germany with G. T. Fechner’s Vorschule der Asthetik in 1876. Its use in America appears in K. E. Gilbert’s History of Esthetics in 1953, in relation to “esthetics from above.” Gilbert used the opposition to contrast philosophical …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.109-126
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00046.009

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Description: Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
AMERICANIST HISTORIANS OF ART are discussed here because of their chronological priority: they appeared in the field of pre-Columbian studies more than a full generation before the social scientists in anthropological archaeology and sociology. …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.127-161
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00046.010

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Description: Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
THE CONVERSION OF esthetic research from idealist speculation on metaphysical principles to experimental procedures began in 1876. It rebuilt classical esthetics “from above” into the method of science “from below,” as Fechner then called it. …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.162-194
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00046.011

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Description: Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
FROM DISCOVERY till now, both delight and horror have been complementary esthetic responses to the arts and customs of Amerindian peoples, from the Décadas of Peter Martyr to the Blood of Kings by Linda Schele and Mary Miller. Yet neither delight nor horror is an adequate description of esthetic content. Put into context they begin to outline the continuum of esthetics. Given the human condition, this continuum embraces all possible experience and emotion. …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.195-199
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00046.012

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Description: Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
Bibliography
PublisherYale University Press
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00046.013

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

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Description: Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
Index
PublisherYale University Press
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00046.014
Esthetic Recognition of Ancient Amerindian Art
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