List of illustrations

  • Rooster weathervane
  • Fruit
  • Poster, New York Art Directors Club
  • Untitled
  • Untitled
  • Pitcher
  • Advertisement, Westinghouse
  • Advertisement, Bahlsen
  • Graphic Arts Production Yearbook
  • Cover design, UCLA
  • Victorian mask
  • Caricature: Hitler or Groucho?
  • Hypothetical IBM logo
  • Poster, Tri Arts Press
  • Cover design, Knopf
  • Unknown
  • Poster, UCLA
  • Poster, University of Hartford
  • Old sign
  • Poster, PDR
  • Recruiting poster, Yale University
  • Unknown
  • Rosette, enlargement of a toy roundel
  • Exercise to bring the question of intuition down to earth
  • Exercise to bring the question of intuition down to earth
  • Poster, Tokyo and Osaka Communication Arts
  • Sketch for Tokyo and Osaka Communication Arts poster
  • Logo, IBM
  • Logo, Westinghouse
  • Trademark, American Broadcasting Company
  • Hieroglyph
  • Logo, UPS
  • Annual report cover, Cummins Engine Company
  • Logo, Pastore DePamphilis Rampone
  • IBM identification
  • Logo, Monell Chemical Senses Center
  • Logo, Mossberg & Company Inc.
  • Logo, Benjamin Franklin 90th anniversary
  • Logo, IBM
  • Logo, Irwin Financial Corporation
  • IBM identification
  • NEXT logo, Caslon typeface
  • NEXT logo, Bifur typeface
  • NEXT logos, possible typefaces
  • NEXT logos, use of lowercase letters
  • NEXT logos, lowercase e
  • NEXT logos, e as an mnemonic element
  • NEXT logo, with cube
  • NEXT logo, two lines
  • NEXT logos
  • NEXT logo, on envelope
  • Fashion logos from The Limited brochure
  • The Limited logo, the problem of readability
  • The Limited logos, capital letters
  • The Limited logos, the problem of the "the"
  • The Limited logo, doubling the stroke of each letter
  • The Limited logo
  • The Limited logo
  • The Limited logo, shopping bag
  • The Limited logo, shopping bag
  • The Limited logo
  • The Limited logo
  • IBM logos
  • IBM logo, early application of the outline version
  • IBM logo
  • IBM logos, 13 and 8 lines
  • IBM logos, sampling of color variations
  • IBM logo, color coding
  • Annual report cover, IBM
  • Packages featuring IBM logo
  • IBM logo
  • Package designs, IBM Supply Kit
  • IBM logo
  • IBM 75th anniversary poster
  • IBM logo, incorporated into a product name
  • IBM logo/Palisades Education Center
  • IBM logo, on official document
  • IBM logo, eye
  • IBM logo, bee
  • IBM logo, M
  • Adstar logo
  • Adstar logo
  • Adstar logos
  • Adstar logo
  • Adstar logos
  • IDEO logo
  • IDEO logos
  • IDEO logos
  • IDEO logo
  • Morningstar logo
  • Morningstar logo
  • Morningstar logo, star configurations
  • Morningstar logo, star configurations
  • Morningstar logo, single round O
  • Morningstar logo, egg
  • Morningstar logo
  • Student drawing from Kunstgewerbeschule, Basel
  • Student drawing from Yale University
  • Yale University School of Art Graduate Program brochure
  • Yale University School of Art Graduate Program brochure
  • Yale University School of Art Graduate Program brochure
  • Jacket, Eric Gill's "An essay on typography"
  • Title page and typical design for text pages, Eric Gill's "An essay on typography"
  • Single-Alphabet type design
  • Die Neue Typographie
  • Title page, Tschichold
  • Congo (chimpanzee) painting
  • Unknown
  • DADA-Bild
  • NEW
  • Unknown
  • Neue Wege der Photographie
  • Unknown
  • Unknown
  • Unknown
  • Ostsee - Jahr 1931
  • Eye chart
  • Campaign contribution
Free
Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
Contents
Author
PublisherYale University Press
Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
Everything we do has some aesthetic implication. It was John Dewey’s contribution to the philosophy of art to point out that art is not something special but a significant part of daily experience, and that a real understanding of life is synonymous with aesthetic enjoyment. “In order to understand the aesthetic in its ultimate and approved forms, one must begin with it in the raw; in the events and scenes that hold the attentive eye and ear of man, arousing his interest and affording him …
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PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
To understand the meaning of design is to sense the common thread that weaves its way through the arts of painting, architecture, and industrial and graphic design. It is also to understand the part form and content play in the intricate process of design, and to realize as well that design is also commentary, opinion, a point of view, and social responsibility. To design is much more than simply to assemble, to order, or even to edit; it is to add value and meaning, to illuminate, to simplify, …
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PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
Michelangelo, responding to the demands of Pope Julius II about the completion of the Sistine Ceiling, replied, “It will be finished when I shall have satisfied myself in the matter of art.” “But it is our pleasure,” retorted the pope, “that you should satisfy us in our desire to have it done quickly.” And it was not until he was threatened with being thrown from the scaffolding that Michelangelo agreed to be more expeditious. On the whole, however, the relationship between Michelangelo and the …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
“All knowledge,” said Whitehead, “is derived from and verified by direct intuitive observation.” But such observation provides little comfort for those who need the security of down-to-earth proof. Judgments that lack the support of the opinion makers or of research findings are generally suspect. Some of the reasons, it seems, that intuition has not won accolades are that it is only vaguely understood and virtually impossible to pin down. “What is this intuition?” asks Henri Bergson. “If the …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
“It reminds me of the Georgia chain gang,” quipped an IBM executive when he first eyed the striped logo. The Westinghouse insignia was greeted similarly when it was first shown in 1960: “This looks like a pawnbroker’s sign.” How many exemplary works have gone down the drain because of such pedestrian fault-finding? And how many good designs became bad designs as a consequence of mindless dabbling on the part of clients with little or no understanding of visual logic? …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
Canned presentations have the ring of emptiness. The meaningful presentation is custom designed — for a particular purpose, for a particular person. How to present a new idea is, perhaps, one of the designer’s most difficult tasks. This how is not only a design problem, it also pleads for something novel. Everything a designer does involves presentation of some kind — not only how to explain (present) a particular design to an interested listener (client, reader, spectator), but how the design …
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PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
What should a logo for Next look like? Choosing a typeface as the basis for the design of a logo is a convenient starting point. Here are two examples: Caslon and Bifur. Caslon is an alphabet designed as far back as 1725 by William Caslon. It appears to be a good choice because it is both elegant and bookish, qualities well suited for educational purposes. Bifur, a novelty face by A. M. Cassandre, was designed in 1929. An unconventional but ingenious design, it has the advantage, to some, of …
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PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
In 1925, Coco Chanel helped change the way one looks at fashion insignias. In the past, identification for products linked with fashion was rather delicate and wispy. Ideas were interpreted literally. The kind of vision it took to use a letterform traditionally associated with heavy industry, with trucks, for example, or, more appropriately, with posters or newspaper headlines, was revolutionary. In 1992, however, the Chanel logo is as spry and timely as ever. Today, almost anything goes. …
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PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
The IBM logo is the IBM look... The purpose of this brochure is to document the origin and development of the IBM logo, to illustrate its use, and to point to some of the design problems involved in its implementation. The importance of the logo as a symbol of goodwill cannot be overestimated. For it is not simply a passive decoration on a nameplate or letterhead; it is also an active ingredient in the complex process of marketing and design. The design of the IBM logo, like any design problem, …
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PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
1. Letter combinations and letter sequences are determining factors in the design of most logos. The example shown is a straightforward interpretation of the word Adstar. It does little to lead the spectator away from its most obvious interpretation: Ad = advertising, star = Hollywood. The Ad configuration is phonetically and visually separated from the complete word. 2. In the next version the dS combination introduces a jumbled effect. The two-color combination somewhat alleviates the …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
Pictures, abstract symbols, materials, and colors are among the ingredients with which a designer or engineer works. To design is to discover relationships and to make arrangements and rearrangements among these ingredients. All design involves combinatorial geometry. The logo for IDEO is based on this discipline. This geometric emphasis, incidentally, is appropriate in terms of form and content. Just as proportion and contrast are aspects of form, appropriateness, that is, fitness to purpose, …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
1. A short word is easy and pleasant to read. MORNINGSTAR is the compounding of two words. It is neither short nor easy to read. This (below) is easier to read ... but there are problems inherent in this combination of letters that are impossible to avoid. As a single word, Morningstar seems unwieldy. The letter combinations NIN, GS, and TA tend to form clusters and separate from the whole, causing difficult spacing problems. Condensing each letter saves space and insures compactness. The …
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PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
Except for the absence of human sensibility, the computer is a most awe-inspiring machine. But the language of the computer is the language of technology, not the language of design. It is also the language of production. It enters the world of creativity only as an adjunct, as a tool — a time-saving device, a means of investigating, retrieving, and executing tedious jobs — but not as the principal player. In education this art versus production dilemma is inescapable. The moment the balance is …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
Eric Gill’s admirable little book, first published in 1931 in a limited edition, is important less for its erudition about the theory and practice of typography than for the moral support it gives to artists, whose principal concern is the quality of their work; to businessmen, who are chiefly interested in the bottom line; and to printers and publishers, who are more concerned with traditional practices than with wild ideas. Even though An Essay on Typography deals with technical difficulties, …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
Cézanne had been dead nineteen years and Cubism was celebrating its eighteenth birthday when Jan Tschichold wrote “Elementare Typographie.” The art “isms” new and not so new had been around for some time: Impressionism, Pointillism, Cubism, Futurism, Suprematism, Constructivism, Neoplasticism, and Dadaism. But names such as Mondrian, Schwitters, Arp, Malevich, Van Doesburg, Kandinsky, Marinetti, Le Corbusier, and Lissitzky, who represented the avant-garde of painting, architecture, and …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Design, Form, and Chaos
In the history of painting and design, from Cimabue (1240–1302) to Cassandre (1901–1968), communication between artist and spectator was rarely a problem. Today, the emphasis on style over content in much of what is alleged to be graphic design and communication is, at best, puzzling. Order out of chaos is not the order of the day.* The deluge of design that colors our lives, our print, and our video screens is in harmony with the spirit of our time. No less than drugs and pollution, the big …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

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Design, Form, and Chaos
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