List of illustrations

  • Tombstone rubbing
  • Medallion
  • The flatbroom, a Shaker invention
  • Shaker door latch
  • Newspaper advertisement, William H. Weintraub & Company, Inc.
  • Magazine cover, Apparel Arts
  • T'ai chi symbol (Yang and Yin)
  • Any visual image may serve as a symbol
  • Newspaper advertisement, Alfred A. Knopf
  • Magazine cover, Direction
  • Magazine advertisement, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • Booklet cover, New York World's Fair
  • Magazine cover, Direction
  • Perfume bottle
  • One-sheet poster (redrawn), N.Y. Subways Advertising Co.
  • Brochure, IBM Corporation
  • Newspaper advertisement, Frank H. Lee Co.
  • Unknown
  • Brochure cover, U.S. Navy, U.S.S. Lexington
  • Brochure, Autocar Corporation
  • Poster, Aspen Design Conference
  • Brochure, Coordinator Inter American Affairs
  • Poster, Aspen Design Conference
  • Magazine advertisement, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • T.V. Billboard, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • Newspaper advertisement, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • Logo, Westinghouse
  • Corn mask
  • Trademark, Helbros Watch Company
  • Trademark, Consolidated Cigar Company
  • Trademark, Colorforms
  • Trademark, United Parcel Service
  • Trademark, American Broadcasting Company (blurred)
  • Trademark, American Broadcasting Company
  • Trademark, Tipton Lakes Corporation
  • Annual report cover, Cummins Engine Company
  • Cover design, PM Magazine
  • Poster, IBM Gallery
  • Jacket design, Paul Theobold and Company
  • IBM Logo
  • Package designs, IBM Supply Kit
  • Folder, IBM Corporation
  • Magazine advertisement, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • Bulb packaging, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • Catalogue cover, Museum of Modern Art
  • Jacket design, Pantheon
  • Cover design, Vintage Books
  • 24-sheet poster, Twentieth Century Fox
  • Annual report cover, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • Magazine advertisement, Jacqueline Cochran
  • Newspaper advertisement, Frank H. Lee Company
  • Jacket design, Pantheon
  • Magazine advertisement, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • Jacket design, Wittenborn, Schultz, Inc.
  • Magazine advertisement, Jacqueline Cochran
  • Magazine advertisement, Jacqueline Cochran
  • Cover design, Vintage
  • Jacket and book design, Alfred A. Knopf
  • Magazine cover, Direction
  • Book illustration (variation), Listen! Listen!, Harcourt Brace & World
  • Magazine advertisement, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • Magazine cover, Direction
  • Jacket design, Alfred A. Knopf
  • Magazine cover, Direction
  • Etched goblet, Coronet Brandy
  • Magazine advertisement, Cresta Blanca Wine Company
  • Magazine advertisement, Cresta Blanca Wine Company
  • Magazine advertisement, Cresta Blanca Wine Company
  • Advertisement, Ohrbach's
  • Cover design, Wittenborn & Company
  • Jacket design, Pantheon
  • Jacket design, Pantheon
  • Stencils
  • Newspaper advertisement, G.H.P. Cigar Company
  • Book jacket, Alfred A. Knopf
  • Brochure cover, The Autocar Company
  • IBM Office Products
  • Profile with a staring eye
  • Advertisement, Container Corporation
  • Announcement card, The American Advertising Guild
  • Advertisement (detail), Smith, Kline & French Laboratories
  • Cover design, Apparel Arts
  • Advertisement, Dunhill Clothiers
  • Letterhead, Columbus, Indiana, Visitors Center
  • Folder, IBM Corporation
  • Annual report, Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Foundation
  • Newspaper advertisement, Frank H. Lee Co.
  • Advertisement, Kaiser-Frazer Corporation
  • Illustration, Stafford Fabrics
  • Magazine cover, Direction
  • Poster, Museum of Modern Art
  • Cover design, IBM Corporation
  • Magazine cover, Idea: International Advertising Art
  • Trade advertisement, Smith, Kline & French Laboratories
  • Cover design, American Institute of Graphic Art
  • Poster, G.H.P. Cigar Company
  • Book illustration, Listen! Listen!, Harcourt Brace & World
  • Poster, G.H.P. Cigar Company
  • Advertisement, Kaiser-Frazer Corporation
  • Prospectus, Smith, Kline & French Laboratories
  • Poster, Interfaith Day Movement, Inc.
  • Jacket design, Rinehart and Company
  • Magazine advertisement (detail), Dubonnet Corporation
  • Magazine advertisement, Dubonnet Corporation
  • Magazine advertisement, Dubonnet Corporation
  • AIGA
  • AIGA
  • Cover design, AIGA, 50 Books
  • Advertisement, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • Prospectus, New York Art Directors Club
  • Jacket design, Alfred A. Knopf, Zokeisha
  • Newspaper advertisement, Ohrbach's
  • Cover design, Alfred A. Knopf
  • Book illustration, I Know a Lot of Things, Harcourt Brace & World
  • Cover design, Harvest Books
  • Book cover illustration, Alfred A. Knopf
  • Visual interpretation of Maurice Denis's 1890 definition of Neotraditionism, (Design Quarterly)
  • Jacket design, Alfred A. Knopf
  • Cover design, Museum of Modern Art
  • A printed circuit and simple silhouette of a hand
  • Prospectus, Yale University School of Art
  • Poster, Museum of Modern Art
  • Poster, U.S. Department of the Interior
  • Advertisement, G.H.P. Cigar Company
  • Poster, IBM Corporation
  • Magazine cover, Jazzways Inc.
  • Annual report cover, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • Advertisement, Penn/Brite papers, New York & Pennsylvania Company
  • Folder, IBM Corporation
  • Label designs, Schenley Distillers Inc.
  • Advertisement, Olivetti
  • Brochure cover, IBM Corporation
  • Label design, Dubonnet Corporation
  • Magazine advertisement, Disney Hats
  • Annual report, Cummins Engine Company
  • Brochure, The Autocar Corporation
  • Book illustration, Listen! Listen!, Harcourt Brace & World
  • Keepsake, Pastore DePamphilis Rampone, Inc.
  • Binding, Alfred A. Knopf
  • Jacket and book design, Alfred A. Knopf
  • Broadside, Westvaco Corporation
  • Cover design, Design Quarterly
  • Advertisement, Disney Hats
  • Advertisement, Stafford Fabrics
  • Annual report, Cummins Engine Company
  • Two letters from a Cresta Blanca Wine logotype
  • Advertisement, Smith, Kline & French Laboratories
  • Advertisement, Seeman Brothers, Air-Wick
  • Prospectus, Smith, Kline & French Laboratories
  • Poster, New York Art Directors Club
  • Cover design, A. D. Magazine
  • Magazine cover, Direction
  • Magazine cover, Direction
  • Magazine cover, Direction
  • Poster, IBM Corporation
  • Jacket design, Alfred A. Knopf
  • Magazine cover, Direction
  • Booklet, Coordinator of Inter American Affairs
  • Magazine advertisement, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • Title page, Museum of Modern Art
  • Title page, Wittenborn Schultz, Inc.
  • Title page, Art Institute of Chicago
  • Annual report, IBM Corporation
  • Jacket design, Wittenborn, Schultz, Inc.
  • Poster, U.S. Department of the Interior
  • Type design, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • Jacket design, Albert Bonnier
  • Annual report, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • Badia de Fiesole
  • Crossword puzzle
  • Tangram
  • Tangram
  • Illustration, Rapid Lessons in Abbreviated Drawing
  • Chinese character for "tan" (sunrise), 9-division square
  • Chinese character for "tan" (sunrise), 2-division square
  • The Modulor
  • Panel Exercise
  • The Grid System
  • Byzantine mason's mark
  • Tatami (floor mats)
  • Geometric pattern on which much of the painting of Josef Albers is based
  • Clarinet
  • Cut paper composition
  • Vallauris 1951 Exposition
  • Bull's Head
  • Six Persimmons
  • Photogram of an abacus
  • Advertisement, Nederlansche Kabelfabriek
  • Chasen
  • Black
  • Steel building
  • Cover, Art Institute of Chicago
  • Jacket design, Wittenborn, Schultz, Inc.
  • Vegetation
  • Guernica, detail
  • Magazine advertisement, Westinghouse Electric Corporation
  • Label, Guinness
  • Jardiniere
  • Bottles, Chanel
  • Scaferlati Caporal tobacco package and Garnier Elixir wood bottle
  • Visual concept of IBM Product Centers
  • Package design, IBM Corporation
  • Package designs, IBM Corporation
  • Bottle design, Nutri Cola Bottling Company
  • Package designs, G.H.P. Cigar Company
  • Package designs, Cummins Engine Company and Fleetguard
  • Untitled photograph
  • Yale (Brissago, Switzerland)
  • Format: 26 x 36.6 centimeters
  • Untitled illustration
  • Still Life with Apples
  • Contrast of Forms
  • A. M. Cassandre
Free
Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
Contents
Author
PublisherYale University Press
Free
Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
This book is a compilation of my writing that has appeared in the past – much of it in Thoughts on Design. My interest has always been in restating the validity of those ideas which, by and large, have guided artists since the time of Polyclitus. I believe that it is only in the application of those timeless principles that one can even begin to achieve a semblance of quality in one’s work. It is the continuing relevance of these ideals that I mean to emphasize, especially to those who have …
Author
PublisherYale University Press
Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
In 1890 Maurice Denis said: “It is well to remember that a picture – before being a battle horse, a nude woman, or some anecdote – is essentially a plane surface covered with colors, assembled in a certain order.” He was saying about design what Vasari in the sixteenth century had already eloquently put into words: “Design is the animating principle of all creative processes.” …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
Visual communications of any kind, whether persuasive or informative, from billboards to birth announcements, should be seen as the embodiment of form and function: the integration of the beautiful and the useful. Copy, art, and typography should be seen as a living entity; each element integrally related, in harmony with the whole, and essential to the execution of an idea. Like a juggler, the designer demonstrates his skills by manipulating these ingredients in a given space. Whether this …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
To believe that a good layout is produced merely by making a pleasing arrangement of some visual miscellany (photos, type, illustrations) is an erroneous conception of the graphic designer’s function. What is implied is that a problem can be solved simply by pushing things around until something happens. This obviously involves the time-consuming uncertainties of trial and error. However, since the artist works partly by instinct, a certain amount of pushing around may be necessary. But this …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
Because graphic design, in the end, deals with the spectator, and because it is the goal of the designer to be persuasive or at least informative, it follows that the designer’s problems are twofold: to anticipate the spectator’s reactions and to meet his own aesthetic needs. He must therefore discover a means of communication between himself and the spectator (a condition with which the easel painter need not concern himself). The problem is not simple; its very complexity virtually dictates …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
The same symbol can express many different ideas. It is potentially a highly versatile device. By juxtaposition, association, and analogy the designer is able to utilize its effectiveness to fulfill a specific function. …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
A trademark is a picture. It is a symbol a sign an emblem an escutcheon . . . an image. There are good symbols . . . like the cross. There are others . . . like the swastika. Their meanings are taken from reality. Symbols are a duality. They take on meaning from causes . . . good or bad. And they give meaning to causes . . . good or bad. The flag is a symbol of a country. The cross is a symbol of a religion. The swastika was a symbol of good luck until its meaning was changed. The vitality of a …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
Nature has striped the zebra. Man has striped his flags and awnings, ties and shirts. For the typographer, stripes are rules; for the architect they are a means of creating optical illusions. Stripes are dazzling, sometimes hypnotic, usually happy. They are universal. They have adorned the walls of houses, churches, and mosques. Stripes attract attention. …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
Trite ideas, or unimaginative translation of those ideas, are often the result not of poor subject matter but of poor interpretation of a problem. In the absence of a fresh visual solution, subject matter sometimes becomes the scapegoat. Such difficulties may arise if a) the designer has interpreted a trite idea with a commonplace image; b) he has failed to resolve the problem of integrating form and content; or c) he has failed to interpret the problem as a two-dimensional organization in a …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
Roger Fry, commenting on the problem of integrating representational and formal elements, states: “This may, perhaps, give us a hint as to the nature of such combinations of two arts, namely, that cooperation is most possible where neither of them is pushed to the fullest possibilities of expression, where in both a certain freedom is left to the imagination, where we are moved rather by suggestion than statement.” …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
The source of the creative impulse is a mystery. Where do ideas come from? Any theory about inspiration must be offered with certain reservations. Ideas may come from anywhere, anything, any time, any place. For the most part, however, I believe that they spring from rather unromantic, sometimes unexpected, or even unsavory sources. The artist is a collector of things imaginary or real. He accumulates things with the same enthusiasm that a little boy stuffs his pockets. The scrap heap and the …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
The emotional force generated by the repetition of words or pictures and the visual possibilities (as a means of creating texture, movement, rhythm, indicating equivalences of time and space) should not be minimized. The possibilities of repetition are limitless. Repeat patterns are only one familiar form. There is repetition of color, direction, weight, texture, dimension, movement, expression, shape, and so on. Repetition is an effective way of achieving unity. …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
Readership surveys demonstrate the significance of humor in the field of visual communication. The reference is not principally to cartoon strip advertisements or to out-and-out gags, but to a more subtle variety, one indigenous to the design itself and achieved by means of association, juxtaposition, size relationship, proportion, space, or special handling. …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
A single letter says more than a thousand words. The dual reading is what makes such images memorable. They amuse as they inform. The U symbol is an experiment in visual puns, as is the cover design for AIGA, which combines a rebus (the eye for the letter I) and a collection of letters to produce a mask. Of the twenty-six letters of the alphabet, the letters B and I are clearly the most graphic and least subject to misinterpretation. The rebus is a mnemonic device, a kind of game designed to …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
It is a truism that the fundamental problem of the advertiser and publisher is to get the message into the reader’s mind. Commonplace images and unimaginative visualization afford the spectator little reason to become engrossed in an advertiser’s product. Radio and television advertisers, who use media by which it is possible for studio and home spectators to take part in the proceedings, have discovered the value of audience participation. Producers of print advertising, on the other hand, must …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
Disputes arising between the two schools of typographic thought, the traditional on the one hand and the modern on the other are, it seems to me, the fruits of misplaced emphasis. I believe the real difference lies in the way space is interpreted: that is, the way in which an image is placed on a sheet of paper. Such incidental questions as the use of sans-serif typefaces, lowercase letters, ragged settings, primary colors, etc., are at best variables that tend merely to sidetrack the real …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
One of the objectives of the designer who deals with type matter involves readability. Unfortunately, however, this function is often taken too literally and overemphasized at the expense of style, individuality, and the very effectiveness of the printed piece itself. By carefully arranging type areas, spacing, size, and color, the typographer is able to impart to the printed page a quality that helps to dramatize the contents. He is able to translate type matter into tactile patterns. …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
In a survey made by Clark University in 1911 to ascertain “the relative legibility of different faces of printing types,” twenty-six faces of widely dissimilar designs were studied, among which were Caslon, Century, Cheltenham, and News Gothic. “Ye gods! and has it come to this?” was the reaction of F. W. Goudy, the prolific type designer, to the results of the survey, which judged News Gothic to be “the nearest approximation of an ideal face.” This tidbit appeared in Mr. Goudy’s Typologia,
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
In 1959 in a paper titled Typography U.S.A., the Type Director’s Club announced: “At last a new form... an entirely new concept in typography has been realized, a typography that is purely American. This new typography, the product of contemporary science, industry, art, and technology, has become recognized internationally as the ‘New American Typography’!” …
Author
PublisherYale University Press
Chapter subject tags:Graphic DesignTypography

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
The absence in art of a well-formulated and systematized body of literature makes the problem of teaching a perplexing one. The subject is further complicated by the elusive and personal nature of art. Granted that a student’s ultimate success will depend largely on his natural talents, the problem still remains how best to arouse his curiosity, hold his attention, and engage his creative faculties. …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
Taboos and prejudices have long created limiting barriers to experimentation and to meaningful work in the arts. Here I should like to attack one particular prejudice – that against the color black. …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
“I’m not so concerned with the art or graphics of package design as I am with new developments in packaging technique – new materials, new construction and new applications.” This statement was made some years ago by a specialist in package design. Today the tawdriness of most supermarket shelves bears witness to this lack of emphasis on decent design in our daily lives. …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
A graphic designer deals principally with printed matter – with two-dimensional space problems. Frequently, directly or indirectly, he ventures into the world of the three dimensional. Packaging must be dealt with as a two and three dimensional problem. The angles from which a bottle or package may be viewed are important considerations for the package designer. The problems of optical illusion and visual distortion are but a few considerations about which the designer must be aware. …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
Color theories of Goethe, Chevreul, Ostwald, Rood, or Munsell, among others, are not much help when facing a blank canvas. Color is objective; color is subjective. A color that is perfect in one instance is useless in another. Color is complexity personified. The use of color implies a knowledge, or at least an awareness, not only of the mechanics of color, but also of the formal, psychological, and cultural problems involved. Color cannot be separated from its physical environment without …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
Teaching art (design), perhaps more than other disciplines, involves a special kind of commitment from both teacher and student. Most complex is the task of formulating the problem. Ideally, an assignment should be so conceived as to be palatable, challenging, and absorbing, inviting curiosity and encouraging exploration. It should deal not only with formal but with manual skills. Following is a problem description which attempts to fulfill some of these varied and desirable goals. …
Author
PublisherYale University Press

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
The lesson that we learn from Léger had its origins in Cézanne. As was the case with so many artists at the beginning of this century, however, it was a lesson Léger innocently misinterpreted. …
Author
PublisherYale University Press
Chapter subject tags:Graphic DesignArt, Modern

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
It is no secret that the real world in which the designer functions is not the world of art, but the world of buying and selling. For sales, and not design are the raison d’être of any business organization. Unlike the salesman, however, the designer’s overriding motivation is art: art in the service of business, art that enhances the quality of life and deepens appreciation of the familiar world. …
Author
PublisherYale University Press
Chapter subject tags:Graphic DesignCommercial art

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
We are told “One picture is worth more than a thousand words,” but is it? Does any one ad, poster, trademark, book jacket, letterhead, or TV commercial tell us of the compromises, doubts, frustrations, or misunderstandings that went into its making?
Author
PublisherYale University Press
Chapter subject tags:Graphic DesignCommercial art

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Paul Rand: A Designer’s Art
Next chapter