List of illustrations

  • Vectorial Elevation, Relational Architecture 4
  • Voz Alta, Relational Architecture 15
  • Magnavoz
  • Actual No. 1 (recto)
  • Actual No. 1 (verso)
  • Zócalo
  • Manifesto Ultraísta Vertical (recto and verso)
  • Vida-Americana: Revista Norte, Centro y Sud-Americana de Vanguardia, no. 1
  • Portrait of W. Kennedy
  • In My Bed
  • Painters at the open-air school in Coyoacán, painting Luz Jiménex
  • Indian with Red Serape
  • Indian of the Tunas
  • Portrait of Manuel Maples Arce (verso of Indian of the Tunas)
  • Zapatistas at Rest
  • Fernando Leal Painting
  • Luz with Parrot
  • Man with Cigarette (Trinidad)
  • Creation
  • The Feast of the Lord of Chalma
  • The Feast of the Lord of Chalma, study
  • The Feast of the Lord of Chalma, preparatory drawing (artist's self-portrait)
  • Our Gods, study for a frieze (group of four figures, left panel of the triptych)
  • Our Gods, study for a frieze (Coatlicue with crucifix, central panel of the triptych)
  • The Feast of the Lord of Chalma, study
  • Massacre at the Templo Mayor
  • Scaled Composition (study for Massacre at the Templo Mayor)
  • Massacre at the Templo Mayor, study
  • Actual No. 3
  • Andamios interiores
  • Portrait of Manuel Maples Arce
  • Sculptures by Guillermo Ruiz, shown in Luis Garrido, "Le escultura cubista en Mexico," Revista de Revistas (September 17, 1922), 44 (left to right: Portrait of Garrido, Dancer, Portrait of Francisco Orozco Muñoz, Portrait of Manuel Maples Arce)
  • After the Rain
  • The Tree (possibly, El Pedregal)
  • Subestación (La Indianilla)
  • Port
  • Allegory of the Virgin of Guadalupe
  • Andamios exteriores
  • Líneas de alta tensión
  • Peasant
  • The Planting of the Cross in the New World
  • Crane
  • The Planting of the Cross in the New World, study
  • Unfinished mural for the Escuela de Ferrocarrileros, Mexico City
  • Tejedores
  • Trapiche
  • Cargadores
  • Lavanderas
  • Irradiator, no. 1, magazine front cover
  • Advertisement for El Buen Tono
  • Advertisement for El Buen Tono
  • Kyn Taniya [Luis Quintanilla], Radio (Mexico City: Editorial Cultura, 1924)
  • Café de 5 centavos
  • Irradiador estridencial
  • Nación
  • Irradior, no. 2, magazine front cover
  • Las calamidades de México
  • Ms. Flo 826 Chut, estridentista beauty
  • Diorama estridentista, with illustrations by David Alfaro Siqueiros and Norah Borges
  • Diorama estridentista, with illustrations by Walt Kuhn and María M. de Orozco
  • Letterhead of Ediciones del Movimiento Estridentista
  • Illustration for "El verdadero origen del jazz" by J. M. Durán y Casahonda
  • Illustration for "Quinta Avenida" by José Juan Tablada
  • Illustration for "La ciudad múltiple" by Humberto Rivas
  • Illustration for "T. S. H." by Manuel Maples Arce
  • El Universal Ilustrado: Siluetas y coasas que pasan
  • Portrait of Germán List Arzubide
  • Portrait of Germán List Arzubide
  • Portrait of Germán List Arzubide
  • Portrait of Esperanza Crespo
  • Calaveras de artesanos
  • Chemin de Croix: Illème station, première chute
  • The Factory
  • New York
  • El Universal Ilustrado: El grabado de madera en México
  • Old Woman, Santa Anita
  • Head of Indian
  • Dance of the Crescent Moon
  • Dancers
  • Dance of the Little Deer
  • Two Mothers (Indian Mother and Child, Bourgeois Mother and Child)
  • Psychological Portrait of Manuel Maples Arce
  • Untitled cover image for "Esquina" by Germán List Arzubide
  • Chicken Vendor
  • Mother and Child
  • Market Woman
  • El cargador
  • Cargador
  • Book cover for "Urbe" by Manuel Maples Acre
  • Untitled woodcut for first canto of Urbe
  • Untitled woodcut for second canto of Urbe
  • Untitled woodcut for third canto of Urbe
  • Untitled woodcut for fourth canto of Urbe
  • Untitled woodcut for fifth canto of Urbe
  • Metropolis
  • Portrait of Germán List Arzubide
  • Portrait of Kyn Taniya
  • Portrait of Leopoldo Méndez
  • Portrait of Manuel Maples Arce
  • Untitled
  • Three Fish - Gourds, Mexico, 1925
  • El café de nadie
  • El café de nadie (second version)
  • Installation photographs of Café de Nadie exhibition
  • Self-Portrait with Pancho Villa and La Adelita
  • Portrait of Migeul N. Lira
  • Self-Portrait with Pancho Villa and La Adelita, preparatory sketch
  • Los cantos de la Revolución: La Adelita
  • Manuel Maples Arce in Xalapa
  • Manifesto estridentista No. 3
  • Factory
  • Telegraph Wires
  • El Pípila
  • Tres Ollas de Oaxaca
  • The Adoration at Chalma
  • Shop Window
  • Zapatistas
  • Workers' March
  • School boys performing military exercises, dressed as revolutionaries
  • Rural school for girls in Naranjal, Veracruz
  • Rooftops of Xalapa
  • Xalapa Street
  • Telegraph Wires
  • The Station
  • Peasant and Worker against Capitalism
  • Germán List Arzubide at the Tribune
  • Portrait of Manuel Maples Arce
  • Voladores
  • Strike
  • Photograph of march in Xalapa in support of President Calles's policies against the Cristeros
  • Workers
  • Workers, Mexico City
  • Untitled ["Indians carrying blocks of stone on their back for the …"]
  • Tank No. 1
  • Labor 2
  • El crucificado
  • El sembrador
  • Untitled ["Loading bananas in Veracruz for the U.S."]
  • Conquistas de la Revolución
  • Dactilográfica, with a poem by J. J. P.
  • Edificio Estridentista
  • Rooster
  • Frontispiece for El movimiento estridentista
  • Radio Station for Estridentópolis
  • Fruit Vendor
  • Drawing for "Muestrario de mujeres"
  • Untitled
  • Untitled
  • Untitled
  • La rumba
  • Untitled [Panchito shooting at the moon]
  • Hé bonsoir la Lune!
  • Untitled [U.S. intervention in the Mexican Revolution]
  • Untitled [Mexican president addressing the world]
  • Veracruz Port
  • Estridentópolis
  • Indian Women on Market Day
  • The Collective Model
  • Escultura y talla directa
  • Door of the School of Sculpture and Direct Carving
  • First 30–30 Manifesto
  • Conservadores conservados
  • Untitled [study for a ¡30–30! vignette]
  • Magazine cover, ¡30–30! Órgano de los pintores de México
  • Portrait of Salvador Novo
  • Third 30–30 Manifesto
  • Photographs from ¡30–30! exhibition of prints
  • Sandino
  • Workers' Wake
  • Fifth 30–30 Manifesto
Free
Description: Mexico’s Revolutionary Avant-Gardes: From Estridentismo to ¡30–30!
Contents
PublisherYale University Press
Free
Description: Mexico’s Revolutionary Avant-Gardes: From Estridentismo to ¡30–30!
This book has been gestating for a long time and could not have been possible without the help of many people. I am particularly grateful to my Columbia University adviser, Keith Moxey, whose creativity, intelligence, and kindness from my days as an undergraduate inspired me to become an art historian. Christina Kiaer, my coadviser, lent her support when I most needed it and showed me how to be a better writer. Alfred MacAdam, an unwavering ally since my undergraduate years, provided keen …
PublisherYale University Press
Description: Mexico’s Revolutionary Avant-Gardes: From Estridentismo to ¡30–30!
Mexico’s first self-acknowledged avant-garde movement, Estridentismo (stridentism), erupted in 1921 with the distribution of the explosive manifesto Actual No. 1 by the poet Manuel Maples Arce (1898–1981) in Mexico City. Riddled with insults for the literary establishment and the bourgeoisie, the manifesto set forth an aesthetic plan to renovate jaded artistic conventions and overturn the status quo, replacing the lyrical aesthetic that had dominated the Mexican arts with a dissonant artistic …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Mexico’s Revolutionary Avant-Gardes: From Estridentismo to ¡30–30!
In the final days of December 1921, Manuel Maples Arce, a twenty-one-year-old law-student-cum-poet, rebelled. His radical and subversive act consisted of plastering the walls of Mexico City in the dead of night with an avant-garde manifesto. Actual No. 1 (figs. 4 and 5) resembled newspapers with blaring headlines and competed in the crowded urban arena with sundry advertisements for bullfights, cigarettes, and concerts. Its bold typography was intended to capture the attention of pedestrians, …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Mexico’s Revolutionary Avant-Gardes: From Estridentismo to ¡30–30!
The previous chapter concerned the audacious act of an individual who espoused a vision of modernity as a global phenomenon. Technological advances that could bridge vast distances—the radio, telegraph, airplane—made it possible for Manuel Maples Arce to argue that Mexico did not need to think of itself as peripheral or lagging in relation to Europe. He positioned his aesthetic as internationally cutting-edge and addressed an audience beyond national borders. His bold gesture did not take into …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Mexico’s Revolutionary Avant-Gardes: From Estridentismo to ¡30–30!
During the explosion of creative activity related to the launch of the mural movement, Manuel Maples Arce continued to explore the avant-garde aesthetic that he had proposed in Actual No. 1 and established an ever-widening network of alliances among artists and writers, which shaped his movement and led it in new directions. Arqueles Vela and Germán List Arzubide became his two closest allies in literature, but he met them as a result of the dissemination of his texts. Prior to this, his kindred …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Mexico’s Revolutionary Avant-Gardes: From Estridentismo to ¡30–30!
So far this narrative, in analyzing Estridentismo through its dialogue with the visual arts, does not resemble traditional histories of the movement, which have tended to take literature as a point of departure. By reading the movement against the grain, I reinterpret Estridentismo’s significance to art and post-revolutionary culture in general. But there is no denying that Estridentismo played itself out in the literary sphere in important ways and that these interventions marked other forms of …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Mexico’s Revolutionary Avant-Gardes: From Estridentismo to ¡30–30!
During the early 1920s, as Manuel Maples Arce promoted his aesthetic program and extended his sphere of influence, he fostered an over-arching definition of Estridentismo, embracing artists who rejected bourgeois values or academic culture. Works of art unrelated to the cult of modernity and the urban aesthetic espoused in Actual No. 1 therefore became widely recognized as estridentista, especially those in media long associated with preindustrial cultures, such as woodcuts and masks. These were …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Mexico’s Revolutionary Avant-Gardes: From Estridentismo to ¡30–30!
Estridentismo underwent a fundamental shift when Manuel Maples Arce accepted a position as a judge in Xalapa, the capital of his home state of Veracruz, after obtaining his law degree in 1925. Why he chose to abandon Mexico City remains a subject for speculation, but it is likely that employment opportunities were limited for someone who had insulted so many individuals and institutions. Certainly, positions in the cultural sphere were out of the question, since so many of them were in the hands …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Mexico’s Revolutionary Avant-Gardes: From Estridentismo to ¡30–30!
Despite Estridentismo’s departure from Mexico City, an anti-academic attitude remained entrenched in the arts during the second half of the 1920s. It was manifested through publications such as El Machete, the organ of the Syndicate of Technical Workers, Painters, and Sculptors and later of the Communist Party, which wed art and social action; Forma, the cultural magazine edited by Gabriel Fernández Ledesma, which promoted a side-by-side comparison of traditional Mexican arts and visual culture …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Mexico’s Revolutionary Avant-Gardes: From Estridentismo to ¡30–30!
Looking back to Actual No. 1, it is easy to find fault or disregard Manuel Maples Arce’s call to arms, as many have done. Estridentismo nonetheless offers a lens through which to read vanguardism in Mexico as it developed in the decade following the revolution. A great many visual artists considered Maples Arce’s avant-garde model as they explored artistic languages and subjects that would be most appropriate to their contemporary condition. The relationship was by no means one-sided. …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Mexico’s Revolutionary Avant-Gardes: From Estridentismo to ¡30–30!
Index
PublisherYale University Press
Mexico’s Revolutionary Avant-Gardes: From Estridentismo to ¡30–30!
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