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Description: Antifascism in American Art
In many respects this book, like the antifascist struggle in art that it discusses, was a collaborative effort supported by a variety of institutions. Generous grants from Stanford University, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution greatly facilitated the research and writing of the manuscript. During the year I spent in Washington, D.C., as a fellow at the National Museum of American Art, a number of historians and art historians commented constructively on my ideas; …
PublisherYale University Press
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00017.003
Acknowledgments
In many respects this book, like the antifascist struggle in art that it discusses, was a collaborative effort supported by a variety of institutions. Generous grants from Stanford University, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution greatly facilitated the research and writing of the manuscript. During the year I spent in Washington, D.C., as a fellow at the National Museum of American Art, a number of historians and art historians commented constructively on my ideas; together they formed the type of intellectual community of which so many of us dream and so seldom manage to find: Daniel Bluestone, Elizabeth Broun, Chris Clarke, Melissa Dabakis, Lois Fink, Donald Jackson, Bob Korstad, Peter Kuznick, Cynthia McCabe, Garnett McCoy, Virginia Mecklenburg, Sue Ostroff, Sarah Parrott, Rob Snyder, Sally Stein, Susan Sterling, Ellen Todd, and Judith Zilczer.
Special thanks go to Rebecca Zurier, who shared with me her knowledge of prints and offered many incisive comments and probing questions. Lisa Tiersten patiently read the manuscript and offered useful guidelines for rewriting it. I am particularly indebted to Matthew Baigell, who brought his expertise in the history of 1930s American art to bear on the text by making numerous excellent and insightful suggestions. Finally, I had the good fortune at Yale University Press to work with Judy Metro, a thoughtful and helpful editor, and Harry Haskell, whose meticulous and intelligent corrections improved the manuscript throughout.
Above all, two people whose patient support and intellectual encouragement knew no bounds deserve my everlasting thanks. Wanda Corn warmly encouraged me from the beginning to develop the topic and to think through each issue as completely as possible. She read several drafts of the manuscript and generously criticized my work in long phone conversations and meetings. As a remarkable and enthusiastic teacher and scholar, she has always stood as a model for my own academic pursuits. Finally, my husband, Jim Herbert, shared in all of the day-to-day frustration and excitement of the project: he believed in my work when my energy and confidence flagged, and he enthusiastically discussed, challenged, or developed new ideas with me. He read each draft with unparalleled care and interest, correcting infelicities of style and challenging inconsistencies of logic. This book is dedicated to him.
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