Account infoAddressPrivacy and Preferences
Helen A. Cooper
Helen A. Cooper is the former Holcombe T. Green Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture at the Yale University Art Gallery.
Cooper, Helen A.
Cooper, Helen A.
United States of America
Subscribed to the newsletter
Send me site notifications emails
John Trumbull: The Hand and Spirit of a Painter
John Trumbull's paintings of the key events of the Revolutionary War are among the most familiar and revered images in American art. In 1832 Trumbull gave to Yale College his most important history paintings and portraits. This gift established the Yale University Art Gallery, making it the first college art museum in the Western hemisphere. In celebration of this event, the Gallery has mounted the first major exhibition of Trumbull's work. The fully illustrated catalogue that accompanies the exhibition opens with a biography of Trumbull by Helen A. Cooper. Following it are interpretative essays by Jules David Prown on Trumbull as a history painter, Oswaldo Rodriguez Roque on the artist's conflicting attitudes toward portrait painting, Patricia Mullan Burnham on the religious subjects, Bryon Wolf on the landscapes, Martin Price on the literary themes, and Egon Verheyen on the Capitol Rotunda commissions. The essays are followed by extensive catalogue entries on 170 paintings and drawings.
Print publication date January 1982 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780894670244
EISBN 9789998006256
Illustrations 250 illus.
Print Status out of print
Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: American Art from the Yale University Art Gallery
The American experience—from its colonial beginnings to the modern age—has captured the imagination of all Americans, including its artists. This book explores works from the renowned collections of American paintings, decorative arts, prints, and photographs at the Yale University Art Gallery and creates a vivid portrait of a young country defining itself culturally, politically, and geographically.

Distinguished scholars shed new light on American history by examining some of the most familiar and revered objects in American art—paintings by Trumbull, Peale, Copley, Eakins, Church, and Homer; silver by Revere and Tiffany; furniture by Roux and Connelly; and photographs by Muybridge, among others. The authors discuss how issues of cultural heritage, patriotism, politics, and exploration shaped America’s art as well as its attitudes and traditions.
Print publication date August 2008 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300122893
EISBN 9780300232486
Illustrations 65 b/w + 315 color illus.
Print Status out of print
Free
Thomas Eakins: The Rowing Pictures
Works in the Exhibition
Thomas Eakins: The Rowing Pictures
Selected Bibliography
Description: Thomas Eakins: The Rowing Pictures
“I hope you have been boating,” Eakins wrote to his sister Caroline from Paris, “Our Schuylkill is so beautiful at this season.” Thomas Eakins to Caroline Eakins, October 8,1866. PAFA. Eakins loved rowing. He had learned to row long before he went to Europe and was an enthusiastic and knowledgeable oarsman...
Thomas Eakins: The Rowing Pictures
On Independence Day, 1870, Thomas Cowperthwait Eakins (1844–1916) returned to his native Philadelphia after three and a half years of rigorous artistic training in Europe (fig. 1). The date was auspicious: bristling with ambition, fearless and passionate, the twenty-six-year-old was eager to begin life as a professional artist in his own land.
Free
Thomas Eakins: The Rowing Pictures
Considered one of the greatest artists America has produced and the foremost realist of his time, Thomas Eakins (1844–1916) enjoys a well-established place in the history of art; equally well-established are the facts of his turbulent career. Painter, sculptor, and photographer, he was also an influential and inspiring teacher at the Pennsylvania Academy of...
Free
Thomas Eakins: The Rowing Pictures
Acknowledgments
Free
Thomas Eakins: The Rowing Pictures
Lenders to the Exhibition
Free
Thomas Eakins: The Rowing Pictures
Contents
Thomas Eakins: The Rowing Pictures
During the 1870s rowing became a tremendously popular sport in the United States. An enthusiastic rower, the young Thomas Eakins painted, sketched, and drew an extraordinary series of rowing pictures that were the most ambitious project of his early career. Eakins' 24 rowing works, which include some of the most celebrated and recognized images in the history of American art, are brought together and examined as a group for the first time in this book. Together they shed light on the artist's creative process and subsequent achievements as well as on social, cultural, and artistic concerns central to nineteenth-century audiences.

Helen A. Cooper, along with essayists Martin A. Berger, Christina Currie, and Amy B. Werbel, discusses various aspects of Eakins' rowing series, explaining his affection for the sport, his adoption of the images of popular culture into the realm of fine art, his commitment to novel, "modern" subjects, his preoccupation with perspective and measurement, and his belief that the most profound artistic truths were best expressed through the human figure—particularly the male figure. A comparison of the rowing pictures reveals that over the four years in which they were created, Eakins moved subtly from the analytic and descriptive toward the more feeling and suggestive. As a group devoted to a single subject, the series is unmatched in the oeuvre of this masterful painter.
Print publication date July 1998 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300069396
EISBN 9780300232509
Illustrations 72 illus.
Print Status out of print