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Jules David Prown
Jules David Prown is the Paul Mellon Professor Emeritus of the History of Art at Yale University. He served as the first Director of the Yale Center for British Art from 1968 to 1976.
Prown, Jules David
Prown, Jules David
United States of America
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Discovered Lands, Invented Pasts: Transforming Visions of the American West
Our picture of the Old West, a West distant in time and now physically transformed—the West of cowboys and Indians, of wagon trains rolling westward and herds of buffalo grazing on vast prairies—has been colored by countless romanticizations in film and fiction and art. One purpose of this book, and of the accompanying exhibition, is to re-examine surviving contemporary paintings,...
Discovered Lands, Invented Pasts: Transforming Visions of the American West
A common theme of western American art—from the depictions of Indians by early explorers to the monumental landscapes of Albert Bierstadt to the vibrant images of Georgia O’Keeffe—is the transformation of the land through European-American exploration and resettlement. In this book, leading authorities look at western American art of the past three centuries, reevaluating it from the perspectives of history, art history, and American studies.

Jules David Prown begins the book by discussing the need for interdisciplinary approaches to broaden the study of western American art. Nancy K. Anderson then calls for a reconsideration of western art as art rather than documentation and for the adoption of new methods to probe its aesthetic, historical, political, and cultural complexities. William Cronon explores what an environmental historian might learn from American landscape art, concluding that each image must be read as a multilayered view intertwining past, present, and future within a larger context of progress and expansionism. Examining representations of American Indians, Brian W. Dippie finds that early works pictured them caught in a process of dramatic change while later artists showed them frozen outside of time: when the frontier ended, western art made nostalgia its defining characteristic. Martha A. Sandweiss argues that the ways in which views of the American west and its peoples reached nineteenth-century audiences—through large-edition prints, book illustrations, or theatrical exhibitions—significantly affected both the images and the meanings attached to them. Susan Prendergast Schoelwer challenges popular perceptions of the frontier as a womanless domain, discovering abundant pictures of Native American women in the art of the western fur trade. Howard R. Lamar concludes by discussing the changing perceptions of western artists and inhabitants of their region’s landscape in the twentieth century.
Print publication date May 1992 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300057225
EISBN 9780300234312
Illustrations 132 illus.
Print Status out of print
John Trumbull: The Hand and Spirit of a Painter
It seems deceptively easy to place John Trumbull in the development of American art. When the major artists of the preceding generation, Benjamin West and John Singleton Copley, remained in England after the War of Independence, Trumbull and Gilbert Stuart carried forward in America the arts of history painting and portraiture, respectively, during the early years of the Republic. Trumbull’s...
John Trumbull: The Hand and Spirit of a Painter
John Trumbull's paintings of the key events of the Revolutionary War are among the most familiar and revered images in American art. In 1832 Trumbull gave to Yale College his most important history paintings and portraits. This gift established the Yale University Art Gallery, making it the first college art museum in the Western hemisphere. In celebration of this event, the Gallery has mounted the first major exhibition of Trumbull's work. The fully illustrated catalogue that accompanies the exhibition opens with a biography of Trumbull by Helen A. Cooper. Following it are interpretative essays by Jules David Prown on Trumbull as a history painter, Oswaldo Rodriguez Roque on the artist's conflicting attitudes toward portrait painting, Patricia Mullan Burnham on the religious subjects, Bryon Wolf on the landscapes, Martin Price on the literary themes, and Egon Verheyen on the Capitol Rotunda commissions. The essays are followed by extensive catalogue entries on 170 paintings and drawings.
Print publication date January 1982 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780894670244
EISBN 9789998006256
Illustrations 250 illus.
Print Status out of print
Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: American Art from the Yale University Art Gallery
If one had to choose a single word to describe the change that has taken place in the study of American art over the past half century, the word would be...