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Susan Dackerman
Susan Dackerman is John and Jill Freidenrich Director of the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University and was previously the Carl A. Weyerhaeuser Curator of Prints at the Harvard Art Museums.
Dackerman, Susan
Dackerman, Susan
United States of America
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Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe
~Although Albrecht Dürer never saw a rhinoceros, his 1515 woodcut was the authoritative representation of the animal for centuries. Based on drawn and written accounts sent from Lisbon, where a rhinoceros had been shipped from India as a gift to the King of Portugal, Dürer’s woodcut was a revelation because a rhinoceros had not been...
Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe
~In 1515 Albrecht Dürer designed the first printed representations of the constellations of the northern and southern celestial hemispheres. Hardly an isolated artistic project, these woodcuts emerged from an environment of rigorous investigation of the heavens in Dürer’s native Nuremberg. Broadsheets describing the function of astronomical...
Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe
~In the early modern period, knowledge of the natural world was organized around such categories as natural philosophy, which examined the physical universe as it was perceptible to the senses, seeking the causes of natural phenomena; natural history, which described the particular properties of objects in the natural world, and because it included the study of...
Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe
Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe examines the participation of celebrated artists in the scientific inquiries of the sixteenth century. By investigating the close working relationships...
Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe
Susan Dackerman (Editor), Claudia Swan (Contributor), Suzanne K. Schmidt (Contributor)
An unusual collaboration among distinguished art historians and historians of science, this book demonstrates how printmakers of the Northern Renaissance, far from merely illustrating the ideas of others, contributed to scientific investigations of their time. Hans Holbein, for instance, worked with cosmographers and instrument makers on some of the earliest sundial manuals published; Albrecht Dürer produced the first printed maps of the constellations, which astronomers copied for over a century; and Hendrick Goltzius's depiction of the muscle-bound Hercules served as a study aid for students of anatomy.

Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe features fascinating reproductions of woodcuts, engravings, and etchings; maps, globe gores, and globes; multilayered anatomical "flap" prints; and paper scientific instruments used for observation and measurement.
Author
Susan Dackerman (Editor), Claudia Swan (Contributor), Suzanne K. Schmidt (Contributor)
Print publication date September 2011 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300171075
EISBN 9780300238365
Illustrations 271 Illus.
Print Status out of print