Helen Weston
 
Weston, Helen
Weston, Helen
United States of America
Subscribed to the newsletter
Send me site notifications emails
Description: The Image of the Black in Western Art, Volume III: From the “Age of...
The conventions of representation that governed allegorical painting and views of African tribal life could hardly be more different from each other, yet an allegory of Africa could sometimes contain more information...
Description: The Image of the Black in Western Art, Volume III: From the “Age of...
In the eighteenth century black people became an increasingly familiar part of the urban scene, especially in northern European countries and North America. Those who inhabited the fluid world of the city were, with few exceptions, either slaves or former slaves or descended from an ancestor freed from service. In all but a few cases they were at the least privileged end of society, obliged to...
Description: The Image of the Black in Western Art, Volume III: From the “Age of...
Like other forms of luxury associated with court life and display, ownership of black pages and body servants became increasingly available...
Description: The Image of the Black in Western Art, Volume III: From the “Age of...
This chapter is concerned with the way in which courtly fantasies involving blacks and Africa were absorbed and adapted by the increasingly self-confident urban populations emerging in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, in London and Paris in particular. If the court remained the dominant cultural force in Italy, in Germany (whether Catholic or Protestant principalities), and in...
Description: The Image of the Black in Western Art, Volume III: From the “Age of...
The eighteenth-century European court inherited from its predecessors a rich vein of fantasy, expressed in a continuum from extravagantly painted allegorical ceilings to ceremonial activities that involved the ruler and his family and attendants in a theatricality that transformed even the most mundane aspects of life. Almost all of this theatricality could involve the presence of blacks, either...
Description: The Image of the Black in Western Art, Volume III: From the “Age of...
It is by the finest tints, and most insensible gradations, that nature descends from the fairest face about St. James’s, to the sootiest complexion in Africa: at which tint of these, is it, that the ties of blood are to cease? And how many shades must we descend lower still in the scale, ‘ere Mercy is to vanish with them?—but ‘tis no uncommon thing, my good Sancho, for one...