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Description: Goya in the Twilight of Enlightenment
The great Spanish painter Francisco Goya has long been considered an artist of the Enlightenment who took a heroic stance against the forces of political oppression, and critics have read his art as a reflection of his renegade ideas. In this book Janis A. Tomlinson offers a fresh and innovative interpretation of the major paintings of Goya's mid-career, disentangling the historic Goya from the romanticized Goya and placing his works in the context of the ideological, social, and artistic changes of the times.

Tomlinson examines the social history of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Spain from the outbreak of the French Revolution and its effect on Spain through the restoration of Spain's Bourbon monarchy in 1814. She discusses such well-known works by Goya as the Family of Carlos IV, the Maja vestida and the Maja desnuda, and the Second of May and Third of May, reassessing them in relation to Goya's changing patrons: Carlos IV and María Luisa, the court favorite Manuel Godoy, the rulers of the interim regimes of the Napoleonic years, Fernando VII, and, finally, the broader public characterized by its alienation from a conservative restoration regime. Emphasizing the complexity of the context that engendered these paintings, Tomlinson demonstrates that any reading of Goya's works must acknowledge the unique circumstances of their patronage and ideology in a period of transition and ambivalence.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal*
Print publication date October 1992 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300054620
EISBN 9780300254198
Illustrations 102
Print Status out of print
Description: The Sacred Image in the Age of Art: Titian, Tintoretto, Barocci, El Greco,...
Underlying the religious art of the Renaissance is a tension between the needs of the Church and the impulse to create great works. This book presents sacred images from the 15th and 16th centuries, leading up to two pivotal events in 1563. The Council of Trent, which signified the beginning of the Counter-Reformation, defined requirements that curtailed the freedom of painters and patrons in creating art for churches, while the founding of the Accademia del Disegno in Florence symbolically acknowledged that artists had achieved the status of creators not craftsmen. Marcia B. Hall takes a fresh look at some of the greatest painters of the Italian Renaissance not typically associated with sacred imagery and shows how they navigated their way through the paradox of "limited freedom" to forge a new kind of religious art.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal*
Print publication date March 2011 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300169676
EISBN 9780300235876
Illustrations 214 Illus
Print Status out of print
Description: Vistas de España: American Views of Art and Life in Spain, 1860–1914
In the decades following the American Civil War and leading up to the First World War, a definitive shift in power took place between Spain and the United States. This original book explores American artists’ perceptions of Spain during this period of turmoil and demonstrates how their responses to Spanish art helped to answer emerging, complex questions about American national identity.

M. Elizabeth Boone focuses on works by Thomas Eakins, Mary Cassatt, William Merritt Chase, John Singer Sargent, Robert Henri, and other American artists who traveled to Spain to study the achievements of such great masters as Murillo, Velázquez, and Goya. The resulting American paintings, some well known and others now largely forgotten, provide intriguing insights not only into the 19th-century American struggle to define itself as an imperial power but also into the relations between the United States and the Spanish-speaking world today.
Print publication date March 2007 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300116533
EISBN 9780300242805
Illustrations 141
Print Status out of print
Description: The Young Velázquez: The Education of the Virgin Restored
Donated to the museum in 1925, the Yale University Art Gallery’s Education of the Virgin—depicting Saint Anne teaching a young Virgin Mary to read—was long considered to be a work by an unknown Spanish artist. Considerably damaged, the painting was relegated to storage and never carefully studied until 2005, when John Marciari reattributed the work to Diego Velázquez (1599–1660), the most significant painter of the Spanish Golden Age. The extraordinary narrative of this painting and its reattribution is chronicled here, accompanied by a detailed description of the painting’s conservation campaign and thoughtful analysis of the artist’s technique.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal*
Author
Print publication date November 2014 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300207866
EISBN 9780300254440
Illustrations 38
Print Status in print