List of illustrations

  • Case Study House No. 22
  • Empire State Plaza South Mall
  • Triple Elvis
  • Glamour magazine, cover
  • Razor
  • Harlem Couple
  • Cadillac Cap d'Antibes
  • Marcel Breuer House, Wellfleet, Massachusetts, through car window
  • Architectural model for the Smithsonian Gallery of Art
  • World's Fair night views, New York: Trylon and Perisphere from Rainbow Avenue
  • Poster for New York World's Fair
  • Glass House and Guest House
  • Da Monsta
  • Pavilion in the Lake
  • AT&T Building
  • Glass House
  • Farnsworth House
  • Glass House, interior
  • Brick Guest House
  • Brick Guest House, interior with Andy Warhol
  • Elevations for Syrian Arch scheme for Glass House
  • Seagram Building
  • Four Seasons Restaurant
  • Four Seasons Restaurant
  • Pepsi-Cola Building
  • U.N. Headquarters with General Assembly Building in background
  • Capitol Records Building
  • American pavilion for the Brussels World's Fair
  • Wayne State University, College of Education Building
  • Amon Carter Museum
  • New York State Theater, Lincoln Center
  • Pavilion in the Lake, with Johnson pictured
  • Kaufmann House
  • Fallingwater
  • Kaufmann's Department Store project, drawing of entrance
  • Kaufmann's Department Store project, interior renovation of ground floor
  • Lovell "Health" House
  • Kaufmann Desert House, rooftop terrace ("gloriette")
  • Kaufmann Desert House, patio
  • Kaufmann Desert House, floor plan
  • Glamourized Houses spread
  • Southern California United Air Lines travel poster
  • Miller House
  • Miller House, with Miller on her porch
  • Kaufmann Desert House, entrance with boulders
  • Kaufmann Desert House, glass bedroom wall and pool terrace
  • Kaufmann House (Boulder House) project, overview
  • Kaufmann House (Boulder House) project, elevation
  • Elrod House
  • Bob Hope Estate
  • Kaufmann Desert House
  • Kaufmann Desert House, pool and terrace
  • Kaufmann Desert House, front entrance
  • Saarinen House, dining room, view from pantry
  • Cover of General Motors Technical Center brochure: Where Today Meets Tomorrow
  • TWA Terminal at Idlewild Airport
  • Cover of GM Folks, featuring Cadillac tail fins
  • General Motors Technical Center: night view detail, water tower, and pool
  • Where Today Meets Tomorrow: Employees Restaurant
  • Where Today Meets Tomorrow: For the Traffic of Tomorrow
  • Proposal for U.N. Headquarters at Flushing Meadows, New York
  • Eames House
  • General Motors Technical Center, view of Bertoia screen in the Employees Restaurant
  • General Motors Technical Center, powerhouse
  • General Motors Technical Center
  • General Motors Technical Center, Research and Development stairs with models and 1958 Buick
  • Brazil pavilion at New York World's Fair, ramp
  • General Motors Technical Center, Styling Building stairs
  • General Motors Technical Center, main display area of Styling Dome
  • Aline and Eero Saarinen at a party, sitting in a Womb Chair
  • TWA Terminal at Idlewild Airport, planes on tarmac
  • Rear view of Chevy Impala with "gull wing" fins
  • TWA Terminal building at Idlewild Airport, jetway to planes
  • TWA Terminal building at Idlewild Airport, stair with figures
  • TWA Terminal building at Idlewild Airpot, lobby and sunken lounge
  • TWA Terminal building at Idlewild Airpot, sunken lounge
  • Vassar College, Emma Hartman Noyes Hall, conversation pit
  • TWA Terminal building at Idlewild Airport, stair under construction
  • Paris: Fly TWA poster
  • Oldsmobile Rocket advertisement
  • Los Angeles International Airport, Theme Building
  • Metropolitan Opera House, Lincoln Center, exterior
  • Metropolitan Opera House, interior with chandelier
  • Hotel Row, aerial view
  • Eden Roc Hotel, pool deck
  • New York City views: Times Square to south at night, 1933
  • Seagram's Distillers Corp., Chrysler Building, general view of barroom
  • Mangel's, exterior, at night
  • Beach Theatre, lobby, general view
  • Queen Mary Special Perfume "Nineteen Thirty-six
  • General Electric Tower, New York World's Fair
  • Amusements," graphic from New York World's Fair Guide
  • World's Fair views, Constitution Mall, The Four Freedoms statues, and Trylon and Perisphere
  • Ansonia Shoe Store, entrance view
  • S. S. France, stairway to first-class dining room
  • Drawing of salon and main stairs of the SS Ile-de-France
  • Ship of Tomorrow, interior
  • Sans Souci Hotel
  • The Laurels Hotel and Country Club
  • Sans Souci Hotel, lobby
  • Biltmore Terrace Hotel, entrance façade exterior
  • Biltmore Terrace Hotel, entrance detail
  • Casino
  • Biltmore Terrace Hotel, lobby, center column
  • Algiers Hotel, exterior night view across water
  • Algiers Hotel
  • Algiers Hotel, lobby interior
  • Fontainebleau Hotel, general view from across the road
  • Fontainebleau Hotel
  • Fontainebleau Hotel, staircase to nowhere
  • Fontainebleau Hotel, general view of lobby
  • Eden Roc Hotel, lobby from above
  • Eden Roc Hotel, exterior with balusters and light fixtures
  • Americana Hotel, Bal Harbour, Medallion Dining Room
  • Summit Hotel, exterior from northwest
  • Summit Hotel, lobby, general view
  • Beth Sholom Synagogue
  • Notre Dame du Haut
  • Carr Chapel of St. Savior, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Annie Pfeiffer Chapel, Florida Southern College
  • Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church
  • Beth Sholom Synagogue, sketch
  • Page of photos enclosed in Rabbi Cohen's letter
  • Beth Sholom Synagogue, sketch
  • Beth Sholom Synagogue, section drawings
  • Beth Sholom Synagogue, plan of upper floor
  • Beth Sholom Synagogue, plan of ground floor
  • Beth Sholom Synagogue, under construction
  • Beth Sholom Synagogue, presentation drawing with rays of light
  • Steel Cathedral project, elevation
  • The Living City: ground view
  • Beth Sholom Synagogue, night view
  • Beth Sholom Synagogue, exterior
  • Cover, Town and Country
  • Beth Sholom Synagogue, interior of the sanctuary
  • Beth Sholom Synagogue, view of the bimah, chandelier, and glass roof
  • B'nai Amoona
  • Park Synagogue
  • Second scheme for Adath Jeshurun, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania
  • Kneses Tifereth Israel Synagogue, exterior view
  • Kneses Tifereth Israel Synagogue, interior view
  • Beth El Synagogue
  • Sha'arey Zedek Synagogue
  • First Christian Church
  • Kresge Chapel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Kresge Chapel, interior, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Drawing of the interior of Saarinen's Brandeis Chapel
  • First Presbyterian Church, also known as "Fish Church"
  • First Presbyterian Church ("Fish Church"), interior
  • Air Force Academy Chapel, Cadet Wing
  • Air Force Academy Chapel, interior
  • Cadets on staircase of the Air Force Academy
  • Air Force Academy, plaza and fountains at night
  • Guild House
  • Seattle Public Library
  • Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Art
  • Guthrie Theater
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Description: American Glamour and the Evolution of Modern Architecture
Many people and institutions contributed to this book over the long period of its development. My greatest debt is to Wellesley College, which generously supported my research activities and granted the sabbatical leaves that enabled me to travel, to work in many far-flung libraries and archival collections, and to experience firsthand the wonderful buildings discussed in this study. I am also deeply grateful to the Hadassah International Research Institute on Jewish Women at Brandeis University …
Description: American Glamour and the Evolution of Modern Architecture
In recent years, Mid-Century Modern architecture and design have achieved unprecedented levels of popularity and critical recognition, not only among collectors and “retro-chic” aficionados but among academic historians and scholars as well. This new enthusiasm has resulted in a virtual tidal wave of books, museum exhibitions, and specialized websites devoted to topics ranging from the history of Googie coffee shops and the furnishing of Populuxe suburban houses to specialized studies of the …

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Description: American Glamour and the Evolution of Modern Architecture
Early in his career, Philip Johnson (1906–2005) clearly aspired to be American modernism’s voice-over, the off-camera observer who sets the scene and analyzes the unfolding drama from a position of cool detachment (fig. 14). As co-curator, with the architectural historian Henry-Russell Hitchcock, of the groundbreaking “Modern Architecture: International Exhibition” at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in 1932, and as the coauthor of the influential publication (entitled The International Style: …

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Description: American Glamour and the Evolution of Modern Architecture
Toward the end of World War II, Edgar J. Kaufmann, a wealthy Pittsburgh department-store owner, approached the architect Richard Neutra with a commission to design a substantial winter retreat for himself and his wife, Liliane, in the burgeoning resort town of Palm Springs, California. For well over ten years Kaufmann had been Frank Lloyd Wright’s most loyal and generous patron, and the two men had joined forces to produce a number of extraordinary projects: these included not only Fallingwater, …

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Description: American Glamour and the Evolution of Modern Architecture
When Eero Saarinen died suddenly of a brain tumor on September 1, 1961, he had already become, at the age of only fifty-one, one of the most successful architects in the United States. The darling of corporate America, Saarinen had risen to great heights over the course of his short career (his father Eliel, with whom he had collaborated since the late 1930s, had died in 1950), filling a widespread yearning among American clients for a new kind of modern architecture that would combine the clean …

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Description: American Glamour and the Evolution of Modern Architecture
Throughout the 1950s Morris Lapidus, who had spent the first twenty years of his career as a successful designer of retail shops and other commercial spaces, was the most sought-after hotel architect in Miami Beach, a city that was experiencing unprecedented growth and change (fig. 90). For an ever-expanding audience of seasonal visitors and new residents, many of whom were Jews of Eastern European descent, Lapidus created a highly prized experience, and a gazetteer of images, that captured the …

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Description: American Glamour and the Evolution of Modern Architecture
It may sound peculiar and even disrespectful to consider Frank Lloyd Wright’s Temple Beth Sholom and other postwar synagogues and churches under the heading “American Glamour,” yet of all the building types examined in this book, religious architecture offers the fullest and most complex engagement with the cultural values and aesthetic qualities associated with the concept (fig. 123). These include, as noted in the preceding case studies, strong narrative content; a penchant for drama and …

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Description: American Glamour and the Evolution of Modern Architecture
The postwar decades clearly offered significant new opportunities for American architects—including Wright, Neutra, Lapidus, and a handful of younger men who were either born in the United States or had spent most of their lives there—to experiment with unconventional and innovative approaches to modern design. These challenges to established practice and to the hierarchy of the profession were clearly not welcomed by European modernism’s old guard. In the introduction to the fifth edition …

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American Glamour and the Evolution of Modern Architecture
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