List of illustrations

  • The principal Roman vault forms
  • The Porticus Aemilia, "air" view of model
  • The Porticus Aemilia, façade toward the Tiber
  • The Marble Plan of Rome, fragment showing the Porticus Aemilia and, left, the Horrea Galbae
  • Idealized restoration of several units of the Porticus Aemilia
  • The Market at Ferentino
  • The Sanctuary of Hercules at Tivoli, detail of construction
  • The Sanctuary of Hercules at Tivoli, an arcade
  • The Temple of Jupiter at Terracina, an arcade
  • The Sanctuary of Fortune at Palestrina
  • The Sanctuary of Fortune at Palestrina, model
  • The Sanctuary of Fortune at Palestrina, one of the minor hemicycles
  • The Sanctuary of Fortune at Palestrina, detail of a minor hemicycle vault
  • Section of a minor hemicycle
  • The Tabularium, façade
  • The Mausoleum of Augustus, interior
  • The Mausoleum of Augustus, exterior
  • The tomb of L. Munatius Plancus at Gaeta, interior
  • The "Temple of Mercury" at Baia, section of the vault structure
  • The "Temple of Mercury" at Baia, exterior from above
  • The Domus Tiberiana with later additions beside the Clivus Victoriae
  • Model of Rome, detail of the Palatine
  • The Porta Maggiore, exterior
  • The portico of Claudius at Porto, detail of a column
  • The Claudianum, terrace arcade
  • The Claudianum, analytical drawing of two bays of the terrace arcade
  • Plan of the nymphaeum court of the Domus Transitoria under the Domus flavia on the Palatine
  • Nymphaeum of the Domus Transitoria under the Domus Flavia, showing foundation wall of the Domus Aurea at the far left
  • Rotunda and corridors of the Domus Transitoria, restored, seen from the north
  • Remains of the Domus Aurea by the Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine
  • The Baths of Trajan and the site of the Domus Aurea Esquiline wing from the air
  • Plan of the Domus Aurea wing and the Baths of Trajan
  • Plan of the Domus Aurea wing
  • Painting in the house of M. Lucretius Fronto in Pompeii
  • The Domus Aurea
  • The Domus Aurea
  • The Domus Aurea, cryptoporticus
  • The Domus Aurea, interior of the octagon
  • The Domus Aurea, plan of the octagon
  • The Domus Aurea, analytical drawing of the octagon
  • The Domus Aurea, model of the octagon and its dependencies
  • The Domus Aurea, exterior of the octagon superstructure
  • The Domus Aurea, detail of the octagon superstructure
  • The Domus Aurea, detail of the interior of the octagon
  • Leonardo's Vitruvian figure
  • The Suburban Baths at Herculaneum, atrium pavilion
  • The Suburban Baths at Herculaneum, detail of the atrium pavilion superstructure
  • Air view of the Palatine and its surroundings
  • Diagram of the levels and divisions of Domitian's palace
  • Domitian's Palace, the ramp between Domitian's vestibule and the Domus Tiberiana
  • The Domus Flavia, remains of the libraries
  • Plan of the upper level of Domitian's Palace
  • Air view of the Domus Flavia and Domus Augustana
  • The Domus Flavia peristyle
  • The Domus Flavia basilica, interior and north corner
  • Plans of the state halls of Domitian's palace, to a common scale
  • The Domus Flavia basilica, plan and longitudinal section
  • The Domus Flavia, restoration
  • The Domus Flavia, rooms northwest of the peristyle
  • The Domus Flavia, northwest piers of the triclinium
  • The Domus Flavia, entrance to the triclinium and environs
  • The Domus Flavia, apse of the triclinium
  • The Domus Flavia, nyphaeum by the triclinium
  • Sestertius of Domitian
  • Domitian's Palace, the vestibule
  • The Domus Flavia, interior of the north pier of the aula regia
  • The Domus Flavia, northwest pier of the aula regia and northeast wall of the basilica, detail
  • The Domus Augustana, upper level, peristyle and partially restored southwest rooms
  • The Domus Augustana, upper and lower levels, seen from the west
  • The Domus Augustana, upper and lower levels, seen from the south
  • The Domus Augustana, plan of the lower level
  • The Domus Augustana, looking into one of the octagonal rooms from the east
  • The Domus Augustana, niche
  • The Domus Augustana, detail of niche
  • The Domus Augustana, the lower-level imperial suite from the southeast
  • The Domus Augustana, wall and remains of its pier and doorway arch
  • The Domus Augustana, enfilade, partially restored
  • The Domus Augustana, passageway
  • The Domus Augustana, fountain pool seen from the southeast
  • The Domus Augustana, corridor seen from the northeast
  • The Domus Augustana, lower-level court
  • The Domus Augustana and Hippodromos façades, seen from the northwest
  • The Domus Augustana and Hippodromos façades, seen from the southeast
  • The Domus Augustana and Hippodromos façades, seen from the Circus Maximus
  • The Hippodromos, seen from the southwest
  • Trajan's Baths, plan
  • Trajan's Forum and surroundings, plan
  • Trajan's Markets, isometric drawing of the remains
  • Trajan's Markets, section along the lines given on Figure 7
  • Trajan's Forum, view of the northeast hemicycle from the markets
  • Diagram of the main divisions and stair systems of Trajan's Markets
  • Trajan's Markets, interior of the larger semidomed room
  • Trajan's Markets, detail of lower façade
  • Trajan's Markets, extrados of semidomed room
  • Trajan's Markets, extrados of semidomed room
  • Trajan's Markets from the south
  • Trajan's Markets seen from the west
  • Trajan's Markets, the Via Biberatica from the northwest
  • Trajan's Markets, corridor
  • Trajan's markets, restored front of a shop or office
  • Trajan's Markets, detail of section A2
  • Trajan's Markets, detail of the junction of sections A1 and A2
  • Trajan's Markets, the aula Triana, plan at gallery level
  • Trajan's Markets, The Via Biberatica from the north
  • Trajan's Markets, section B1 from the northwest
  • Trajan's Markets, interior of the aula of section B1
  • Trajan's Markets, analytical drawing of the aula of section B1
  • Trajan's Markets, gallery and piers of the aula of section B1
  • Trajan's Markets, rooms in the interior of section B2
  • The Pantheon, seen from the north
  • The Pantheon, portico column bases and the modern paving over the original steps
  • Perspective sketch of the Pantheon with its forecourt restored conjecturally
  • The Pantheon, plan
  • The Pantheon, portico from the west
  • The Pantheon, detail of the portico superstructure
  • The Pantheon, intermediate block from the northeast
  • The Pantheon, detail of the exterior from the north
  • The Pantheon, half plans at level II (right) and level III (left), and half ceiling plan (left)
  • The Pantheon, entranceway and surroundings from the interior
  • Simplified plan and section of the Pantheon to show the principal levels and radial divisions
  • The Pantheon, section
  • The Pantheon, analytical drawing of the structure at positions 3, 7, 11, and 15
  • The Pantheon, apse and environs
  • The Pantheon, the restored attic at positions 11 and 12, seen from the level III interior cornice
  • The Pantheon, interior of the dome
  • The Pantheon, detail of the coffering
  • The Pantheon, eastern portion of the rotunda exterior from the northeast
  • The Pantheon, detail of the rotunda exterior (the cornice is at level III, the window at position 5)
  • Part of the exterior end of the great position 5 conical vault (the cornice is at level III)
  • The structural system of the Pantheon between levels II and III
  • The Pantheon, the southeast portion of the rotunda exterior between levels II and IV
  • The Pantheon, detail of the interior of the dome, with portions of the vault, arches, and infilling exposed
  • The Pantheon, exterior from the top of the lantern of S. Ivo
  • The Pantheon, exterior of the dome from the northeast
  • The Pantheon, detail of the step-rings of the dome
  • The Panthon, oculus
  • The Pantheon, flank of the intermediate block and portico from the southeast
  • The Pantheon, detail of the northwest junction of the intermediate block and the rotunda at level 1
  • The Pantheon, level I exterior base molding block
  • Model of the Pantheon
  • The Pantheon, drawing of the interior as seen from the niche at position 13
  • Interior of the Pantheon
  • Drawing of the interior of the Parthenon
  • The Pantheon, oculus and dome from the apse
  • The Basilica Ulpia, plan
  • Mosaic, showing builders and an architect
  • Mosaic plan
  • The Domus Flavia, detail of the peristyle wall
  • The Domus Augustana, detail of an upper-level wall
  • Tomb of Trebius Justus, wall painting
  • The Domus Flavia, detail of the northwest inner wall of the Basilica
  • The Piccolo Mercato, detail of a pier
  • Shrine in the barracks of the seventh urban cohort
  • The Hippodromus of Domitian's Palace, detail of engaged column
  • The Amphitheatre at Pozzuoli, substructure vaults
  • The Amphitheatre at Pozzuoli, view of a basement corridor
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Description: The Architecture of the Roman Empire, Volume I: An Introductory Study (Revised...
~In the whole body of architecture in Roman lands, the most striking and fundamental change in stylistic direction took place during the latter half of the first century and the early decades of the second. It was then that the sculptured, linear forms of the classical past were first firmly challenged by the canopied volumes of the future. The vital...

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Description: The Architecture of the Roman Empire, Volume I: An Introductory Study (Revised...
~THE NEW ARCHITECTURE of the Roman Empire first appeared fully characterized in Nero’s Domus Aurea. The exceptional importance that can quite properly be attached to the great wing on the Oppian spur of the Esquiline, the major surviving part of the palace, is not the...

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Description: The Architecture of the Roman Empire, Volume I: An Introductory Study (Revised...
~NERO’S PALACES show how powerfully architectural thinking was affected by the conception and claims of the imperial office, so greatly expanded after Augustus’ death. The extent of Nero’s direct participation cannot...

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Description: The Architecture of the Roman Empire, Volume I: An Introductory Study (Revised...
~DURING Trajan’s reign (98–117) Roman enthusiasm for building never slackened. Social and utilitarian architecture predominated, and a paternalistic but comparatively moderate government sponsored or authorized new construction in hundreds of...

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Description: The Architecture of the Roman Empire, Volume I: An Introductory Study (Revised...
~HADRIAN, of all the Roman emperors, had the deepest personal interest in architecture. He was a poet, amateur architect, painter, administrator, and soldier, a universal man in the...

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Description: The Architecture of the Roman Empire, Volume I: An Introductory Study (Revised...
~GREAT BUILDINGS are the work of great architects. The study of the men under discussion must rest chiefly upon the evidence of their buildings, but there are other sources that add details about their lives and broaden our knowledge of their profession and its practice. Texts identify certain men with specific buildings. There are passages in the...

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Description: The Architecture of the Roman Empire, Volume I: An Introductory Study (Revised...
~ARCHITECTURE properly includes the art of building, and to omit it would be to suggest a division of knowledge and responsibility that Roman imperial architects would not have recognized. Labor, materials, and methods of building were efficiently organized in an economy of construction second only to principles of design in the formation of the new...

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Description: The Architecture of the Roman Empire, Volume I: An Introductory Study (Revised...
~WHAT THE PALACES, the Markets, and the Pantheon show above all else is the maturity of the concept of monumental interior space. The strength and dynamism of imperial civilization were so great that the need for a suitable architecture could not be denied. The Romans, always building, quite naturally sought for forms that would express this ecumenical...

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Description: The Architecture of the Roman Empire, Volume I: An Introductory Study (Revised...
~THE COMPLEXITIES of the story of Greek and Roman architecture are more apparent today than they were a decade or two ago, and it is becoming clear that the varieties of architectural form in antiquity are greater than those found in any of the grand styles of Western art until the nineteenth century. To call all the buildings put up...

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The Architecture of the Roman Empire, Volume I: An Introductory Study (Revised Edition)
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