List of illustrations

  • Trail of Life Symbol
  • Plaque commemorating Newport, Jacob, and Aaron
  • Installation view of Connecticut Native Americans
  • View of the Richard and Jane Manoogian Foundation Gallery of American Art before 1900
  • Installation view of The Power of Pictures: Images from the Collections of the Beinecke Library
  • Katherine Nova McCleary (Little Shell Chippewa–Cree) presenting at the program Rick E. Bartow and Native American Art at Yale
  • The Advisory Council on Native Arts and Cultures examine works at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
  • Installation view of Pueblo Women’s Ceramics from the Patti Skigen Collection
  • Exterior view of the Native American Cultural Center
  • Each Other
  • View of the third floor, Native American Cultural Center
  • View of the second floor, Native American Cultural Center
  • Yellow Hair
  • Wall of Nations
  • Basket
  • River Cane Basket (I-hya Talu-tsa)
  • White Oak Basket
  • River Cane Basket (I-hya Talu-tsa)
  • Our Lands Are Not Lines on Paper
  • Spruce Root Baskets
  • First Teachers Balance the Universe, Part I: Things That Fly (Predator)
  • First Teachers Balance the Universe, Part II: Things That Fly (Prey)
  • Bowl
  • Jar
  • Solo
  • Pot
  • Storage jar
  • Bandolier Bag (Aazhooningwa’on)
  • Moccasins
  • Miniature Canoe
  • Bowl
  • Bowl
  • Cradle
  • Casey Camp Horinek, Citizen of Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma, “Zhutni,” Tribal Councilwoman, Leader of Scalp Dance Society, Sundancer, Delegate to UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Matriarch of Wonderful Family (Grandmother, Companion, Mother, Sister), Defender of Mother Earth
  • Dwain Camp, Ponca, “Shongaska (What Horse, Same Name as Gus McDonald),” Descendant of Gus McDonald, Defender of Mother Earth, Native Rights Activist, Wounded Knee Veteran, Chaplain of Scalp Dance Society, Eldest of Camp Family Crew, and Craig Camp, Sr., Citizen of Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma, “Zhaba Zhinga,” Gus McDonald Descendant, AIM Member, Vietnam Veteran, Wounded Knee Veteran, Alcatraz Veteran, Defender of Mother Earth, Lifelong Sundancer
  • Tamara G. White Eagle, Citizen of Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma, Great Granddaughter of Oscar Makes Cry, Hazel Headman, Citizen of Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma, Granddaughter of Oscar Makes Cry, and Rose I. Kamdlekaule, Citizen of Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma, Great Granddaughter of Oscar Makes Cry, Mother of Bruce A. Johnson
  • Ann Marie Woolworth, Citizen of Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes, Age 13, Basketball Player, Grandparents Are Woolworth and Madbull
  • Enoch Kelly Haney, Citizen of Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, Artist, Former State Senator and Principal Chief of Seminole Nation of Oklahoma
  • Brielle Turney, Citizen of Comanche Nation, Descendant of Chiefs Mugura and Aritka-papi
  • Selection from 10 Little Indian Boys
  • Selection from 10 Little Indian Boys
  • Selection from 10 Little Indian Boys
  • Selection from 10 Little Indian Boys
  • Coiled Basket Tray
  • Pipe Bags
  • The Prisoners Entering Fort Sill
  • Young Kiowas Dressed for a Ceremonial Visit
  • A Kiowa Banquet in the Good Old Days Back Home
  • Indian Prisoners Arriving at Caddo I. T. May 5 1875
  • Indian Council
  • Five Mounted Indians Hunting Deer
  • Two Indians Stalking Deer
  • Fourteen Indians Shown from Behind, Listening to an Indian Woman Addressing Them
  • Elaborate Party of Nine Indians Hunting Buffalo
  • An Officer Addressing a Large Group, Likely the Prisoners in Their U.S. Army Standard Issue Dress
  • Sketchbook: Ceremonial scene
  • Sketchbook: Ceremonial procession scene
  • Sketchbook: Skinning a bison after a hunt
  • Sketchbook: Gathering of Indians
  • Moccasins
  • Container
  • Bicentennial Indian
  • Second Phase Chief Blanket (Hanoolchaadi)
  • Vest
  • Gourd Bowl
  • Gourd Bowl
  • Gourd Bowl
  • Gourd Bowl
  • Model Totem Pole
  • Miniature Canoe with Paddles
  • Moccasins
  • Purse
  • Reindeer Roundup
  • Moccasins
  • Container
  • Basket (Degikup)
  • Bandolier Bag
  • Martingale (Datchípeetaaliche)
  • Dress
  • Cradle
  • Grandmother Carrying Her Grandson
  • Deer in a Forest
  • Woman Carrying a Basket of Blue Corn on Her Head
  • Baby Bonnet
  • Pot
  • Water Jug
  • Water Jug
  • Bowl
  • Couples Dance
  • Feast
  • Family Eating under an Awning
  • Eye-Dazzler Blanket
  • Coyote
  • Bitch (Wild Dog)
  • Sea Monster Mask
  • Gift Basket
  • Model Totem Pole
  • Chilkat Robe (Naaxin)
  • Untitled Drawing
  • Untitled Drawing
  • Untitled Drawing
  • Untitled Drawing
  • Indifferent
  • Lost Boy IV, from the series Never Neverland
  • Untitled
  • As the Women Crossed the River to Join the Men, the Coyote Stole the Baby for the Water Spirit
  • Untitled
  • Untitled
  • Leggings (Gashkidaasebizonan)
  • Bandolier Bag (Aazhooningwa’on)
  • Birchbark Tray
  • Moccasins
Free
Description: Place, Nations, Generations, Beings: 200 Years of Indigenous North American Art
~Place, Nations, Generations, Beings: 200 Years of Indigenous North American Art marks a milestone in the display and interpretation of Native American art at Yale University. It is the first exhibition to bring together Indigenous North American art from the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, and...
PublisherYale University Art Gallery
Free
Description: Place, Nations, Generations, Beings: 200 Years of Indigenous North American Art
~Our profound gratitude, first and foremost, to the ninety-two objects in this exhibition and publication, and to the countless others we met in storage cabinets and cases along the way. Thank you for allowing us to visit with you, hold you, and speak to you. Thank you for teaching us. We are grateful to the artists who created you, and to the ancestors,...
PublisherYale University Art Gallery
Free
Description: Place, Nations, Generations, Beings: 200 Years of Indigenous North American Art
The Quinnipiac Nation belongs to the territory now known as New Haven, Connecticut. According to Indigenous scholar Lisa T. Brooks (Wabanaki), a nation cultivates and renews such “belonging” through connective acts of kinship with the land,...
PublisherYale University Art Gallery
Free
Description: Place, Nations, Generations, Beings: 200 Years of Indigenous North American Art
~Many Indigenous peoples choose to adhere to protocols regarding objects that have been used in a funerary context, often deeming such objects unsuitable for display in museums. In the United States, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) requires institutions receiving federal funding to identify objects in their collections...
PublisherYale University Art Gallery
Description: Place, Nations, Generations, Beings: 200 Years of Indigenous North American Art
Indigenous North American art is an enduring yet under-recognized presence at Yale University. Thousands of artworks and cultural and sacred items—which hold stories of their artists, communities, and lands—live in disparate collections across campus. On display in glass cases or tucked away in storage, in wooden drawers and steel cabinets, with catalogue numbers scrawled across their...
PublisherYale University Art Gallery

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Description: Place, Nations, Generations, Beings: 200 Years of Indigenous North American Art
Establishing culturally enriching spaces for Native American students in higher education remains an ongoing challenge. Such challenges are often compounded not only by the limited number of faculty and curricular resources in Native American Studies but also by the design and culture of many academic institutions...
PublisherYale University Art Gallery

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Description: Place, Nations, Generations, Beings: 200 Years of Indigenous North American Art
The objects in this section speak to artists’ roles as teachers, intellectuals, and innovators. Many pass on knowledge of Indigenous technologies, art forms, and stories to future generations by making works for family, clan members, or the tourist market. Some, such as George Twok Aden Ahgupuk...
PublisherYale University Art Gallery

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Description: Place, Nations, Generations, Beings: 200 Years of Indigenous North American Art
The objects in this section represent Indigenous artists’ reciprocal relationships with the nonhuman “beings” that make up the world, including plants, animals, cosmological forces, and other animate entities. Some works in this section express an artist’s or family’s relationship to a being through their colors, designs, and materials, while others are themselves...
PublisherYale University Art Gallery

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

Free
Description: Place, Nations, Generations, Beings: 200 Years of Indigenous North American Art
~Every effort has been made to credit the artists and the sources; if there are errors or omissions, please contact the Yale University Art Gallery so that corrections can be made in any subsequent editions. All images courtesy Visual Resources Department, Yale University Art Gallery, unless otherwise noted.
PublisherYale University Art Gallery
Place, Nations, Generations, Beings: 200 Years of Indigenous North American Art
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