List of illustrations

  • Chaplet
  • Bead in a Chaplet
  • Bead in a Chaplet
  • Finial of a Chaplet
  • Finial of a Chaplet
  • Book of Hours, use of Rome (Heures, a lusaige de Rome)
  • Portrait of Machtelt Suijs
  • Burial Service
  • The Cemetery of the Innocents and the Mass Grave during the Reign of François I
  • Burial Service
  • Burial Service
  • Cemetery
  • The Astrologer and the Bourgeois
  • Dance of Death: The Nun
  • The Temptation of Avarice
  • The Angel's Counsel against Avarice
  • Young Man with a Skull
  • Skeleton with arrow and black mirror
  • Office of the Dead
  • The Three Living
  • The Three Dead
  • The narrator in a graveyard, looking at himself in a mirror, which shows his reflection in the company of an allegory of Death
  • Memento Mori pendant
  • Memento Mori pendant
  • Memento Mori pendant
  • Antonio Siciliano and Saint Anthony, detail
  • Antonio Siciliano and Saint Anthony
  • Opening of the Mirror of Conscience (Speculum Conscientie), detail
  • Witches
  • Figure of Death (Memento Mori)
  • The Fall of Man (Adam and Eve)
  • St. Jerome in His Study
  • Portrait of Saint Jerome
  • St. Jerome
  • St. Jerome
  • St. Jerome
  • Saint Jerome in His Study
  • De humani corporis fabrica libri septem
  • Anatomiae, hoc est corporis humani dissectionis pars prior…
  • Memento Mori
  • Erasmus of Rotterdam with a Terminus
  • Inkstand with an allegorical figure
  • Time banishing Melancholy
  • Comb with Secular Scenes
  • Comb with Secular Scenes
  • Rosary Pendant: Youth, Age, and Death
  • Rosary Pendant: Youth, Age, and Death
  • Rosary Pendant: Youth, Age, and Death
  • Paternoster Bead from a Rosary or Chaplet with Christ, a Young Woman, and Death
  • Paternoster Bead from a Rosary or Chaplet with Christ, a Young Woman, and Death
  • Paternoster Bead from a Rosary or Chaplet with Christ, a Young Woman, and Death
  • Rosary
  • Bead from a chaplet or rosary, Herod and Salome with the head of John the Baptist on a dish
  • Bead from a chaplet or rosary, Herod and Salome with the head of John the Baptist on a dish
  • Rosary Bead
  • Rosary Bead
  • Rosary Bead
  • Rosary Bead
  • Rosary, detail
  • Rosary, detail
  • Pendant with a Monk and Death
  • Chaplet bead, detail
  • Chaplet bead, detail
  • Chaplet bead, detail
  • Chaplet bead, detail
  • Ivory Tödli
  • Ivory Tödli
  • Ivory Tödli
  • Ivory Tödli
  • Rosary Terminal Bead with the Virgin and Child, Saint Barbara, and Saint Catherine
  • Rosary Terminal Bead with the Virgin and Child, Saint Barbara, and Saint Catherine
  • Rosary Terminal Bead with the Virgin and Child, Saint Barbara, and Saint Catherine
  • Memento Mori Pendant, probably from a rosary
  • Memento Mori Pendant, probably from a rosary
  • Memento Mori: Young woman and cadaver Ecce Finem
  • Memento Mori: Young woman and cadaver Ecce Finem
  • Pommel (fragment) or rosary bead, 4 faces (chaplet)
  • Pommel (fragment) or rosary bead, 4 faces (chaplet)
  • Young Couple Threatened by Death (The Promenade)
  • Rosary Terminal Bead with Lovers and Death's Head
  • Rosary Terminal Bead with Lovers and Death's Head
  • Bead from a Rosary or Chaplet
  • Bead from a Rosary or Chaplet
  • Pendant to a Rosary or Chaplet
  • Pendant to a Rosary or Chaplet
  • Rosary Pendant: Death Mask and Skull Eaten by Worms and Lizards
  • Rosary Pendant: Death Mask and Skull Eaten by Worms and Lizards
  • Pendant to a Rosary or Chaplet
  • Pendant to a Rosary or Chaplet
  • Skull Within an Ornamental Frame
  • Dead Child with Four Skulls
  • Death of the Lovers
  • Dance of Death: The Ploughman
  • Memento mori in form of a tomb
  • Statuette in an openwork box, detail
  • Brooch
  • The Painter and his wife
  • Statuette in an openwork box, detail
  • Anatomical diagram
  • Study of Three Skulls, recto
  • Skull
  • Portrait of a Surgeon
  • Portrait of Girolamo Mercuriale
  • Memento mori
  • Memento mori
  • Vanitas
  • Vanitas, detail
  • Base for a Statuette
  • Base for a Statuette
  • Voluptuosity and Virtue
  • Adam and Eve with a Skeleton
  • The Coat of Arms of Death
  • Young Woman Accompanied by Death
  • Four Naked Women (The Four Witches)
  • A memento mori broadsheet with wishes for the New Year
  • Statuette in an openwork box, detail
  • Memento Mori Prayer Bead
  • Memento Mori Prayer Bead
  • Memento Mori Prayer Bead
  • Cabinet in a Kunstkammer
  • Memento mori
  • Vanitas Still Life
  • Ring
  • Ring
  • Scent case
  • Watch case/skull watch
  • Toothpick
  • Death and the Nun
  • Christ Nailed to the Cross
  • Denise Poncher Before a Vision of Death
  • Death personified as a Skeleton in Prayer
  • Burial Scene
  • Boethius and Philosophy
  • Deathbed Scene
  • Funeral Service
  • The Torment of Unchaste Monks and Nuns, detail
  • Death Striking Down the Living, detail
  • The Temptation to Abandon Faith and The Encouragement of Faith, detail
  • Mary Rides Forth to Confront Accident
  • Comb: Garden of Love
  • Garden of Love, detail
  • Calendar page for May, detail
  • Calendar page for June
  • Dance of Death
  • Statuette in an openwork box, detail
  • Presentation at the Temple, detail of frame
  • Statuette in an openwork box, detail
  • Visitation, detail of frame
  • Statuette in an openwork box, detail
  • Dormition of the Virgin, detail of frame
  • Rosary
  • Frontispiece to Ole Worm's, Museum Wormianum
  • Frontispiece to Ole Worm's, Museum Wormianum, detail
  • Christophori De Pauli pharmacopoei camera materialium ad vivum delineate
  • Memento mori in Landesmuseum Württemberg, KK braun-blaue 14, 1, 26, 17
  • Rosary Pendant: Death Mask and Skull
  • Schematic reconstruction of the Munich Kunstkammer
  • Memento mori
  • Memento mori
  • Memento mori beads in the collection of the British Museum
  • Mr. Bradbury's bead on loan to Manchester
Free
Description: The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe
Contents
PublisherBowdoin College Museum of Art
Free
Description: The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe
A skull with crossbones may warn us away from poison, advise us not to follow a treacherous path, or intervene lest we expose ourselves to an electrical current. Pirates’ flags famously flash such imagery as a demand to obey or face the consequences of resistance. But if we react instinctively to protect ourselves in the face of such pictographs, the intellectual and artistic roots of such...
PublisherBowdoin College Museum of Art
Description: The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe
The faces pass before you, dancing into and out of view as your fingers turn the ivory beads (pl. 1, fig. 1): a young man with an impressive fur-lined cloak, linen shirt, and fashionable cap; an elegantly dressed young woman with her hair held back by a slim coronet;...
PublisherBowdoin College Museum of Art
Pages13 - 80

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Description: The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe
In 1477, Mary, the wealthy young heiress of the Duchy of Burgundy, was facing the consequences of the sudden death of her powerful father...
PublisherBowdoin College Museum of Art
Pages83 - 105

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Description: The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe
Pulled from the national archives in Paris, the above epigraph’s description of an image of death in ivory can be connected to the literal demise of two once-living beings...
PublisherBowdoin College Museum of Art
Pages107 - 119

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Description: The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe
Over seventy early sixteenth-century memento mori in the form of finely carved ivory beads are held in museums across Europe and America. These institutions generally display them as examples of the artistic achievements of the early modern...
PublisherBowdoin College Museum of Art
Pages209 - 227

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Description: The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe
How did medieval makaris (makers, poets) put death into words? How did their poetry of death sound to medieval ears? William Wordsworth (1770–1850) famously defined poetry as “the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings …...
PublisherBowdoin College Museum of Art
Pages229 - 245

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Free
Description: The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe
Bibliography
PublisherBowdoin College Museum of Art
Free
Description: The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe
Index
PublisherBowdoin College Museum of Art
Free
Description: The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe
~In most cases, images of objects and works of art have been provided by the owners, and are reproduced with their permission. We gratefully appreciate their courtesy. The following list applies to photographs for which an additional acknowledgment is due.
PublisherBowdoin College Museum of Art
The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe
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