List of illustrations

  • Memorial to murdered civil rights workers James Chaney, Michael Schwerner, and Andrew Goodman
  • Viola Liuzzo memorial
  • Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Civil Rights Memorial
  • Civil Rights Memorial, detail
  • Testament
  • Vietnam Veterans Memorial
  • Korean War Memorial
  • Memorial to the Jackson State martyrs of May 1970
  • Statue of Confederate General Wade Hampton
  • Confederate Memorial Monument, detail
  • Confederate Memorial Monument
  • Confederate Memorial Monument, detail of bronze collar
  • Nathan Bedford Forrest monument
  • Friends of the Forrest Billboard
  • Monument to the Crescent City White League Insurrection of 1874
  • Multicultural monument
  • Abigail Jordan at the African American Monument
  • Booker T. Washington Memorial
  • African American Monument, detail of unshackled praying hands
  • Black Holocaust Memorial
  • Black Holocaust Memorial
  • Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Martin Luther King, Jr., detail
  • Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Martin Luther King in his Atlanta headquarters
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, detail
  • Mountain of Despair, Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
  • Dogs
  • Police dog attacking Walter Gadsden, Birmingham, Alabama
  • Jimmy Hicks, Julian Bond, John Lewis, and Jeremiah X view the bombed remains of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, Birmingham, Alabama
  • Monuments (left to right): to Pauline Bray Fletcher; Julius Ellsberry; Carrie L. Tuggle; and Ruth L. Jackson
  • Three Ministers Kneeling
  • Children's March
  • Firehosing the Demonstrators
  • Firehosing the Demonstrators, detail
  • Police Dog Attack
  • Police Dog Attack, detail
  • The Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth
  • South Carolina [Confederate] Monument
  • African American History Monument
  • South Carolina Vietnam Veterans Memorial
  • African American History Monument: Slave ship plan
  • African American History Monument: right (north) wing
  • African American History Monument: Slave labor
  • African American History Monument: War Between the States
  • African American History Monument: Emancipation
  • African American History Monument: Reconstruction
  • African American History Monument: Southern States Reacts to Federal Law and Exodus North
  • Obelisk, Shot Caller Records
  • Strom Thurmond, detail of inscription
  • Oak Grove Freedman's Cemetery Memorial
  • Oak Grove Freedman's Cemetery Memorial
  • Our Peace--Follow the Drinking Gourd; Memorial to the Enslaved
  • Our Peace
  • Donelson family graves
  • Confederate Home graves
Free
Description: What Can and Can’t Be Said: Race, Uplift, and Monument Building in the...
~~Images of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s made deep impressions on me when I was growing up in New York State. I remember seeing television coverage of the integration of Little Rock Central High School, which interrupted my mother’s daily appointment with American Bandstand. The Birmingham...
PublisherYale University Press
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Description: What Can and Can’t Be Said: Race, Uplift, and Monument Building in the...
~Among the compensations of the scholar’s solitary life are the advice and assistance of friends old and new. That is one of the pleasures of research. My gratitude belongs first to Catherine W. Bishir, all-knowing scholar of North Carolina architecture. When I was working on another project, Catherine pointed out that it was really the monuments that...
PublisherYale University Press
Description: What Can and Can’t Be Said: Race, Uplift, and Monument Building in the...
In the spring of 1999 twenty members of Congress traveled to Alabama to visit sites and monuments associated with the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Georgia representative John Lewis, a renowned veteran of the movement, had asked members of Congress of both parties to join him on the pilgrimage to inspire them...
PublisherYale University Press
Pages1 - 24

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Description: What Can and Can’t Be Said: Race, Uplift, and Monument Building in the...
One morning in November 2007 residents of Montgomery, Alabama, awoke to discover that the century-old Confederate Memorial Monument adjacent to the state capitol had been defaced. “N.T. 11 11 31” was spray-painted across one of the original inscriptions, and the hands and...
PublisherYale University Press
Pages25 - 65

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Description: What Can and Can’t Be Said: Race, Uplift, and Monument Building in the...
In the past half century, Caroline County, a rural county in northeastern Virginia, has been drawn into the orbits of Washington, DC, and Richmond. Only 1.4 percent of the working population now farms in a...
PublisherYale University Press
Pages66 - 95

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Description: What Can and Can’t Be Said: Race, Uplift, and Monument Building in the...
On a corner of Kelly Ingram Park in Birmingham a bronze statue of the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. gazes pensively across at the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church (fig. 23). In dress, scale, and demeanor, the bronze King could stand unnoticed in a crowd. He wears a business suit. The large Bible he carries in his left hand hints at his religious calling. His body is...
PublisherYale University Press
Pages96 - 133

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Description: What Can and Can’t Be Said: Race, Uplift, and Monument Building in the...
Among the many monuments in Birmingham’s Kelly Ingram Park, one catches the eye (fig. 31). A German shepherd dog, its teeth bared, lunges at a young African American boy. A stern-looking police officer, his eyes hidden behind aviator glasses, pulls...
PublisherYale University Press
Pages134 - 171

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Description: What Can and Can’t Be Said: Race, Uplift, and Monument Building in the...
For aficionados of public monuments, the South Carolina State House Grounds are a treat. They are home to many more monuments than most state capitols can boast. These range from a memorial commemorating a South Carolina...
PublisherYale University Press
Pages172 - 199

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Description: What Can and Can’t Be Said: Race, Uplift, and Monument Building in the...
In recent years, memorials to the broader sweep of African American history, of which South Carolina’s African American History Monument is the most elaborate, have become increasingly common and may eventually overshadow the civil rights monuments. For the moment these works offer a fresh chance to rethink memorial strategies, yet they, too, are limited by the same problems of visual...
PublisherYale University Press
Pages200 - 212

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Description: What Can and Can’t Be Said: Race, Uplift, and Monument Building in the...
Appendix: Caroline County, Virginia, Multicultural Monument Inscriptions
PublisherYale University Press
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Description: What Can and Can’t Be Said: Race, Uplift, and Monument Building in the...
Abbreviations
PublisherYale University Press
What Can and Can’t Be Said: Race, Uplift, and Monument Building in the Contemporary South
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