Artist monographs

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Description: Artemisia Gentileschi: The Language of Painting
Hailed as one of the most influential and expressive painters of the seventeenth century, Artemisia Gentileschi (1593–ca. 1656) has figured prominently in the art historical discourse of the past two decades. This attention to Artemisia, after many years of scholarly neglect, is partially due to interest in the dramatic details of her early life, including the widely publicized rape trial of her painting tutor, Agostino Tassi, and her admission to Florence’s esteemed Accademia del Disegno. While the artist’s early paintings have been extensively discussed, her later work has been largely dismissed.

This elegantly written book provides a revolutionary look at Artemisia’s later career, refuting longstanding assumptions about the artist. The fact that she was semi-illiterate has erroneously led scholars to assume a lack of literary and cultural education on her part. Stressing the importance of orality in Baroque culture and in Artemisia’s paintings, Locker argues for her important place in the cultural dialogue of the seventeenth century.

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Print publication date February 2015 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300185119
EISBN 9780300256970
Illustrations 114
Print Status out of print
Description: Degas at Harvard
This handsome book presents more than seventy paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, and sculptures by Edgar Degas (1834–1917) in Harvard University’s collections—one of the most important holdings of the artist’s work in the United States. In 1911, the Fogg Art Museum was the first museum to mount a one-man exhibition on Degas and was the only museum to do so during the artist’s lifetime. This book examines the history of Degas’s reception in the U.S., and in particular the pivotal role that Harvard played.

Marjorie Benedict Cohn offers a historical account of the formation of the prized collection of Degas’s works at the Fogg. Jean Sutherland Boggs provides an engaging personal recollection of her initial encounter in 1944 with Degas and his champion at the Fogg, associate director Paul J. Sachs, who inspired not only Boggs’s later work on Degas but also that of many other art historians, museum directors, and curators.

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Print publication date August 2005 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300111446
EISBN 9780300243901
Illustrations 88
Print Status in print
Description: Donald Judd
This pioneering book, the first monograph devoted to Donald Judd, addresses the whole breadth of Judd's practices. Drawing on documents found in nearly twenty archives, David Raskin explains why some of Judd's works of art seem startlingly ephemeral while others remain insistently physical. In the process of answering this previously perplexing question, Raskin traces Judd's principles from his beginnings as an art critic through his fabulous installations and designs in Marfa, Texas. He discusses Judd's early important paintings and idiosyncratic red objects, as well as the three-dimensional works that are celebrated throughout the world. He also examines Judd's commitment to empirical values and his political activism, and concludes by considering the importance of Judd's example for recent art.

Ultimately, Raskin develops a picture of Judd as never before seen: he shows us an artist who asserted his individuality with spare designs; who found spiritual values in plywood, Plexiglas, and industrial production; who refused to distinguish between thinking and feeling while asserting that science marked the limits of knowledge; who claimed that his art provided intuitions of morality but not a specific set of tenets; and who worked for political causes that were neither left nor right.
Print publication date November 2010 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300162769
EISBN 9780300229059
Illustrations 117
Print Status in print
Description: Frederic Church: The Art and Science of Detail
Frederic Church (1826–1900), the most celebrated painter in the United States during the mid-19th century, created monumental landscapes of North and South America, the Arctic, and the Middle East. These paintings were unsurpassed in their attention to detail, yet the significance of this pictorial approach has remained largely unexplored. In this important reconsideration of Church's works, Jennifer Raab offers the first sustained examination of the aesthetics of detail that fundamentally shaped 19th-century American landscape painting. Moving between historical context and close readings of famous canvases—including Niagara, The Heart of the Andes, and The Icebergs—Raab argues that Church's art challenged an earlier model of painting based on symbolic unity, revealing a representation of nature with surprising connections to scientific discourses of the time. The book traces Church's movement away from working in oil on canvas to shaping the physical landscape of Olana, his self-designed estate on the Hudson River, a move that allowed the artist to rethink scale and process while also engaging with pressing ecological questions. In sum, Frederic Church: The Art and Science of Detail offers a profoundly new understanding of this canonical artist.
Print publication date November 2015 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300208375
EISBN 9780300234411
Illustrations 103 Illus.
Print Status in print
Description: Georges Seurat: The Art of Vision
This revelatory study of Georges Seurat (1859–1891) explores the artist’s profound interest in theories of visual perception and analyzes how they influenced his celebrated seascape, urban, and suburban scenes. While Seurat is known for his innovative use of color theory to develop his pointillist technique, this book is the first to underscore the centrality of diverse ideas about vision to his seascapes, figural paintings, and drawings. Michelle Foa highlights the importance of the scientist Hermann von Helmholtz, whose work on the physiology of vision directly shaped the artist’s approach. Foa contends that Seurat’s body of work constitutes a far-reaching investigation into various modes of visual engagement with the world and into the different states of mind that visual experiences can produce. Foa’s analysis also brings to light Seurat’s sustained exploration of long-standing and new forms of illusionism in art.
Print publication date July 2015 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300208351
EISBN 9780300248074
Illustrations 141
Print Status in print
Description: Goya in the Twilight of Enlightenment
The great Spanish painter Francisco Goya has long been considered an artist of the Enlightenment who took a heroic stance against the forces of political oppression, and critics have read his art as a reflection of his renegade ideas. In this book Janis A. Tomlinson offers a fresh and innovative interpretation of the major paintings of Goya's mid-career, disentangling the historic Goya from the romanticized Goya and placing his works in the context of the ideological, social, and artistic changes of the times.

Tomlinson examines the social history of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Spain from the outbreak of the French Revolution and its effect on Spain through the restoration of Spain's Bourbon monarchy in 1814. She discusses such well-known works by Goya as the Family of Carlos IV, the Maja vestida and the Maja desnuda, and the Second of May and Third of May, reassessing them in relation to Goya's changing patrons: Carlos IV and María Luisa, the court favorite Manuel Godoy, the rulers of the interim regimes of the Napoleonic years, Fernando VII, and, finally, the broader public characterized by its alienation from a conservative restoration regime. Emphasizing the complexity of the context that engendered these paintings, Tomlinson demonstrates that any reading of Goya's works must acknowledge the unique circumstances of their patronage and ideology in a period of transition and ambivalence.

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Print publication date October 1992 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300054620
EISBN 9780300254198
Illustrations 102
Print Status out of print
Description: Horace Pippin, American Modern
Arguably the most successful African American artist of his day, Horace Pippin (1888–1946) taught himself to paint in the 1930s and quickly earned international renown for depictions of World War I, black families, and American heroes Abraham Lincoln, abolitionist John Brown, and singer Marian Anderson, among other subjects. This volume sheds new light on how the disabled combat veteran claimed his place in the contemporary art world. Organized around topics of autobiography, black labor, artistic process, and gift exchange, it reveals the range of references and critiques encoded in his work and the racial, class, and cultural dynamics that informed his meteoric career.

Horace Pippin, American Modern offers a fresh perspective on the artist and his moment that contributes to a more expansive history of art in the 20th century. Featuring over 60 of Pippin’s paintings, this volume also includes two previously unknown artist’s statements—“The Story of Horace Pippin as told by Himself” and “How I Paint”—and an exhibition history and list of artworks drawn from new research.

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Print publication date February 2020 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300243307
EISBN 9780300257533
Illustrations 121
Print Status in print
Description: John Trumbull: The Hand and Spirit of a Painter
John Trumbull's paintings of the key events of the Revolutionary War are among the most familiar and revered images in American art. In 1832 Trumbull gave to Yale College his most important history paintings and portraits. This gift established the Yale University Art Gallery, making it the first college art museum in the Western hemisphere. In celebration of this event, the Gallery has mounted the first major exhibition of Trumbull's work. The fully illustrated catalogue that accompanies the exhibition opens with a biography of Trumbull by Helen A. Cooper. Following it are interpretative essays by Jules David Prown on Trumbull as a history painter, Oswaldo Rodriguez Roque on the artist's conflicting attitudes toward portrait painting, Patricia Mullan Burnham on the religious subjects, Bryon Wolf on the landscapes, Martin Price on the literary themes, and Egon Verheyen on the Capitol Rotunda commissions. The essays are followed by extensive catalogue entries on 170 paintings and drawings.
Print publication date January 1982 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780894670244
EISBN 9789998006256
Illustrations 250 illus.
Print Status out of print
Description: Louis Le Vau: Mazarin’s Collège, Colbert’s Revenge
From Vaux-le-Vicomte to Versailles, the buildings of Louis Le Vau shaped the image of French court society. None, however, has had as dramatic an effect as Mazarin's Collège (1661–70), the Parisian landmark that now houses the Institut de France. In this first English-language book on Louis XIV's celebrated architect, Hilary Ballon deftly portrays the brilliance and controversy of Le Vau's late career through an exploration of this masterpiece, a hybrid of baroque and classical styles. She tracks the design and construction of the Collège on the basis of splendid drawings, fully illustrated here, integrating into this account previously unknown dimensions of Le Vau's creative personality, his financial entanglements, and his feuds with government leaders.

The story of the Collège begins in 1661 with the death of Cardinal Mazarin, who left an extravagant sum of money for a school to be built in his memory. Le Vau responded with an ambitious architectural tribute intended to launch the development of Paris in a new artistic direction. As Ballon shows, many personal factors figured into the final product, including Le Vau's activities as a real estate developer and entrepreneur, and his explosive response to the Italian baroque master Gianlorenzo Bernini, who visited Paris in 1665. The project ended up significantly over budget, and officials charged Le Vau shortly after his death with embezzling funds. The chief minister, Jean-Baptiste Colbert, led the attack on Le Vau, turning the ethical scandal into an aesthetic crusade to maintain a "classical" look for central Paris.

By relating the intriguing context in which the Collège was created, Ballon explains why traditional definitions of the baroque and classical styles have failed to offer a cohesive understanding of the building. Her examination of the elements informing Le Vau's personal style and his relationship with Colbert brings into sharper focus the phenomenon of royal patronage and opens a new perspective on the development of French classicism at a turning point in Parisian architectural history.
Print publication date September 1999 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780691048956
EISBN 9780300251692
Illustrations 109
Print Status out of print
Description: Manet and the Modern Tradition
Although Edouard Manet has long been regarded as one of the greatest nineteenth-century French artists, there has been little agreement about the real character of his contribution. His beautifully executed paintings often reveal curious tensions in the handling of space and color and leave his intentions unclear. Contemporary writers such as Zola and Mallarmé view his work very differently, and art historians and critics interpret his work in many ways, from strict formalism, devoid of meaning, to internalized musings full of hidden symbolism.

In this investigation of the artist and the society in which he lived, Anne Coffin Hanson examines the ambiguities that surround Manet. Manet is seen not just as an artistic genius, but as a man of his times, subject to the same influences and interests as his contemporaries, and painting, at least initially, with the same knowledge of his craft as his fellow artists. What emerges is a totally new concept of the man and what he was trying to do: a modern artist, complex, witty, ironical, and deeply involved in the world of his day.

Hanson first studies the ideas about art and life to which Manet was exposed through literature and his associations with literary friends. She then analyzes Manet's subject matter considering the influence of traditional masterpieces, as well as current, less-elevated popular imagery. Finally, she considers how he painted, what he learned from his teacher and from the models he admired, and how he developed his own extraordinarily expressive technique. The controlling theme through the book is la vie moderne—that sense of anticipation and enthusiasm about a modern life which would be essentially different from the past, yet rooted in the French tradition. Manet's art expressed the transitory feelings of this crucial moment in French history and yet remains profoundly beautiful and lasting.
Print publication date January 1977 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300019544
EISBN 9780300235869
Illustrations 135 illus.
Print Status out of print
Description: Manet Manette
Manet, a founding father of modernism, is one of the towering figures of nineteenth-century art. In this absorbing book, Carol Armstrong looks closely at Manet’s works to uncover a novel and compelling view not only of the artist but also of modernity itself. As she places his art within frameworks of color, the feminine Other (the “Manette” in “Manet”), and consumerism, Armstrong greatly expands and revises our understanding of this artist as a painter of modern life.

Surveying most of Manet’s diverse output, the book addresses along the way his methods of self-presentation, his exhibition strategies, the relation of his etchings and paintings, the significance of his relationships with the model Victorine Meurent and the painter Berthe Morisot, the painterly construction of identity and gender difference, and much more. At the same time, the book considers contemporary writings by Baudelaire, Zola, the Goncourts, and others who dealt with issues relating to artistic identity and modernity, painting, the model, and femininity. Armstrong concludes that Manet’s work demonstrates consistent preoccupations with defining and contradicting his own signature style of painting and with the gendering of costume, color, and the making of his art. These preoccupations, she shows, suggest a new understanding of Manet’s oeuvre.
Print publication date September 2002 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300096583
EISBN 9780300234404
Illustrations 174 illus.
Print Status out of print
Description: Mark Rothko: The Works on Canvas—Catalogue Raisonné
"Far and away the best monograph ever written on Rothko." —Yve-Alain Bois, Artforum

Originally published in 1998, this quintessential volume presents an overview of Mark Rothko’s stunning corpus of paintings on canvas and panel. With all works reproduced in color, the book includes the images for which Rothko is most famous—the large, hypnotic, poignant fields of color along with almost 400 additional paintings that are far less well known and reveal an artist who was attuned by turns to realism, expressionism, surrealism, and the avant-garde issues of his era.

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Print publication date September 1998 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300074891
EISBN 9780300256444
Illustrations 938
Print Status in print
Description: Michelangelo, Drawing, and the Invention of Architecture
In this engaging book, Cammy Brothers takes an unusual approach to Michelangelo's architectural designs, arguing that they are best understood in terms of his experience as a painter and sculptor. Unlike previous studies, which have focused on the built projects and considered the drawings only insofar as they illuminate those buildings, this book analyses his designs as an independent source of insight into the mechanisms of Michelangelo's imagination. Brothers gives equal weight to the unbuilt designs, and suggests that some of Michelangelo's most radical ideas remained on paper.

Brothers explores the idea of drawing as a mode of thinking, using its evidence to reconstruct the process by which Michelangelo arrived at new ideas. By turning the flexibility and fluidity of his figurative drawing methods to the subject of architecture, Michelangelo demonstrated how it could match the expressive possibilities of painting and sculpture.

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Print publication date September 2008 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300124897
EISBN 9780300260151
Illustrations 281
Print Status out of print
Description: Robert Motherwell: Paintings and Collages (A Catalogue Raisonné,...
Jack Flam (Editor), Katy Rogers (Editor), Tim Clifford (Editor)
Robert Motherwell (1915–1991) was one of the preeminent Abstract Expressionists and a spokesperson for that generation of artists. During a career that lasted half a century, he created a large and varied body of work, constantly reinventing and refining his signature motifs. He produced some of the most innovative and profound imagery of the 20th century, such as the Elegy to the Spanish Republic, Iberia, Open, and Summertime in Italy series, as well as one of the largest and most inventive oeuvres in collage.

This monumental catalogue raisonné documents 1,209 paintings on canvas and panel, 722 paintings on paper, and 889 collages, providing extensive information about each work. The authors present an overview of Motherwell's career, and discuss key topics including the tension between figuration and abstraction in his work, his role as a spokesperson for modernism, and the changing nature of the critical reception of his work. The publication also features a richly detailed, illustrated chronology of his life and will be the definitive reference on Robert Motherwell's paintings and collages for years to come.
Author
Jack Flam (Editor), Katy Rogers (Editor), Tim Clifford (Editor)
Print publication date November 2012 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300149159
EISBN 9780300247404
Illustrations 3122
Print Status out of print
Description: Robert Rauschenberg: Breaking Boundaries
Robert Rauschenberg, one of the most prolific and influential artists of the postwar period, has created an astonishing variety of works during a career spanning more than fifty years. To illuminate the meaning of Rauschenberg’s art and the reasons behind his artistic choices, Robert Mattison in this book focuses closely on a small selection of the artist’s projects. Mattison offers an interpretation of Rauschenberg’s output that is both original and uniquely insightful, based on extensive research and first-hand observation of the artist at work in his studio.

Like Rauschenberg’s own work, the book ranges across a variety of disciplines. Mattison relates the artist’s output to the visual arts, politics, technology, dance, urban theory, and other intriguing contemporary issues. The book examines Rauschenberg’s working process, the effect of his dyslexia on his art, his seminal Combine paintings of the 1950s, fascination with the “space race,” and collaboration with well-known choreographer Trisha Brown. A final chapter explores the art Rauschenberg exhibited in Chile during the dangerous and repressive rule of dictator Augusto Pinochet.
Print publication date July 2003 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300099317
EISBN 9780300233575
Illustrations 104 illus.
Print Status in print
Description: Thomas Eakins: Art, Medicine, and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century Philadelphia
The life and work of Thomas Eakins (1844–1916), America’s most celebrated portrait painter, have long generated heated controversy. In this fresh and deeply researched interpretation of the artist, Amy Werbel sets Eakins in the context of Philadelphia’s scientific, medical, and artistic communities of the 19th century, and considers his provocative behavior in the light of other well-publicized scandals of his era. This illuminating perspective provides a rich, alternative account of Eakins and casts entirely new light on his renowned paintings.

Eakins’ modern critics have described his artistic motivations and beliefs as prurient and even pathological. Werbel challenges these interpretations and suggests instead that Eakins is best understood as an artist and teacher devoted to an exacting and profound study of the human body, to equality for women and men, and to middle-class meritocratic and Quaker philosophies.
Print publication date June 2007 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300116557
EISBN 9780300230956
Illustrations 69
Print Status in print
Description: Thomas Eakins: The Rowing Pictures
During the 1870s rowing became a tremendously popular sport in the United States. An enthusiastic rower, the young Thomas Eakins painted, sketched, and drew an extraordinary series of rowing pictures that were the most ambitious project of his early career. Eakins' 24 rowing works, which include some of the most celebrated and recognized images in the history of American art, are brought together and examined as a group for the first time in this book. Together they shed light on the artist's creative process and subsequent achievements as well as on social, cultural, and artistic concerns central to nineteenth-century audiences.

Helen A. Cooper, along with essayists Martin A. Berger, Christina Currie, and Amy B. Werbel, discusses various aspects of Eakins' rowing series, explaining his affection for the sport, his adoption of the images of popular culture into the realm of fine art, his commitment to novel, "modern" subjects, his preoccupation with perspective and measurement, and his belief that the most profound artistic truths were best expressed through the human figure—particularly the male figure. A comparison of the rowing pictures reveals that over the four years in which they were created, Eakins moved subtly from the analytic and descriptive toward the more feeling and suggestive. As a group devoted to a single subject, the series is unmatched in the oeuvre of this masterful painter.
Print publication date July 1998 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300069396
EISBN 9780300232509
Illustrations 72 illus.
Print Status out of print
Description: The Voyage of the Icebergs: Frederic Church’s Arctic Masterpiece
Twelve days after the onset of the American Civil War in April of 1861, Frederic Edwin Church, the most successful American landscape painter of his day, debuted his latest “Great Picture”—a painting titled The North. Despite favorable reviews, the painting failed to find a buyer. Faced with this unexpected setback, Church added a broken mast to the foreground and changed the work’s title to The Icebergs. He then shipped the painting to London, where it was finally sold to an English railroad magnate and subsequently disappeared from view for 116 years.

This book tells the fascinating story of The Icebergs and provides a detailed look at the cycle of fame, neglect, and resuscitation of both this masterwork and Church’s career. In 1979, The Icebergs sold at auction for $2.5 million, at the time the highest amount ever paid for an American painting. The sale coincided with an upswing in the popularity and acclaim accorded to American landscape painting, catalyzing the market for American art and contributing to a revival in the prestige of Church and the Hudson River School. Drawing on extensive interviews with many of the people involved with the painting’s rediscovery, sale, and eventual donation to the Dallas Museum of Art, the author considers the way marketing has defined The Icebergs.
Print publication date October 2002 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300095364
EISBN 9780300256727
Illustrations 52
Print Status in print
Description: Watercolors by Winslow Homer: The Color of Light
American painter Winslow Homer (1836–1910) created some of the most breathtaking and influential watercolors in the history of the medium. This volume provides a comprehensive look at Homer’s technical and artistic practice as a watercolorist, and at the experiences that shaped his remarkable development. Focusing on 25 rarely seen watercolors from the Art Institute’s collection, along with 75 other related watercolors, gouaches, drawings, and paintings—including many of the artist’s characteristic subjects—the book proposes a new understanding of Homer’s techniques as they evolved over his career. Accessibly written essays consider each of the featured works in detail, examining the relationship between monochrome drawing and watercolor and the artist’s lifelong interest in new optical and color theories. In particular, they show how his sojourn in England—where he encountered leading British marine watercolorists and the dynamic avant-garde art scene—precipitated an abrupt change in technique and subject matter upon his return home. Conservators address the fragility of these watercolors, which are prone to fading due to light exposure, and demonstrate, through pioneering research on Homer’s pigments and computer-assisted imaging, how the works have changed over time. Several of Homer’s greatest watercolors are digitally “restored,” providing an exhilarating glimpse of the original impact of Homer’s groundbreaking color experiments.
Print publication date February 2008 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300119459
EISBN 9780300233629
Illustrations 286
Print Status in print
Description: William Kent: Designing Georgian Britain
Susan Weber (Editor)
The most versatile British designer of the eighteenth century, William Kent (1685–1748) created a style for a new nation and monarchy. The scope of his achievements encompasses architecture, palatial interiors, elaborate gardens, and exquisite furniture. Among his creative innovations are bold combinations of elements from Palladian, rococo, and gothic design, anticipating the intermingling of architectural styles we see today.  William Kent: Designing Georgian Britain is the first comprehensive exploration of this important designer and his extraordinary creations.

An international team of the foremost experts in the field examines the entire spectrum of Kent’s oeuvre, including the interiors at Kensington Palace and Houghton Hall. Essays illuminate issues about the authorship of Kent’s furniture and metalwork, situate his contributions in relation to architectural discourse, and classify the characteristics of his designs.

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Author
Susan Weber (Editor)
Print publication date October 2013 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300196184
EISBN 9780300256482
Illustrations 632
Print Status out of print
Description: Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting
One of the greatest American painters of the 19th century, Winslow Homer (1836–1910) also maintained a deep engagement with photography throughout his career. Focusing on the important, yet often-overlooked, role that photography played in Homer’s art, this volume exposes Homer’s own experiments with the camera (he first bought one in 1882). It also explores how the medium of photography and the larger visual economy influenced his work as a painter, watercolorist, and printmaker at a moment when new print technologies inundated the public with images. Frank Goodyear and Dana Byrd demonstrate that photography offered Homer new ways of seeing and representing the world, from his early commercial engravings sourced from contemporary photographs to the complex relationship between his late-career paintings of life in the Bahamas, Florida, and Cuba and the emergent trend of tourist photography. The authors argue that Homer’s understanding of the camera’s ability to create an image that is simultaneously accurate and capable of deception was vitally important to his artistic practice in all media. Richly illustrated and full of exciting new discoveries, Winslow Homer and the Camera is a long-overdue examination of the ways in which photography shaped the vision of one of America’s most original painters.

Please note: the illustration program in this eBook has been changed slightly from the original print edition.

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Print publication date July 2018 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300214550
EISBN 9780300259766
Illustrations 125
Print Status in print