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David Craven
David Craven (1951–2012) was Distinguished Professor of Art and Art History at the University of New Mexico.
Craven, David
Craven, David
United States of America
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Art and Revolution in Latin America, 1910–1990
This interview by David Craven and Colleen Kattau took place on January 9, 1990, at the home of Gioconda Belli, which is located outside Managua, on a hill overlooking the southern shore of Lake Managua. Also present was Gioconda Belli’s sister Lavinia Belli, known to the present author for a few years through CUSLAR, the Committee on...
Art and Revolution in Latin America, 1910–1990
This interview with the Minister of Culture by David Craven and John Ryder took place at the Nicaraguan Mission to the United Nations in New York City on November 30, 1983. Father Cardenal was in the United States to speak at an opening for an art exhibition...
Art and Revolution in Latin America, 1910–1990
This address of February 25, 1980 was given at the First Assembly of Cultural Workers in the Palace of the Heroes of the Revolution, Managua, Nicaragua. The essay was subsequently published by the Ministry of Culture in an anthology entitled Hacia una política cultural (1980) that consisted of the first public statements by the Sandinista...
Art and Revolution in Latin America, 1910–1990
Gerardo Mosquera and David Craven (Translator) and Colleen Kattau (Translator)
This essay was originally published in El Caimán Barbudo, Havana, vol. 19, no. 212, July 1985, pp. 11–12 and in another version in Concha, Montevideo, vol. 2, no. 545, 31 December 1983, p. 23. Translation by David Craven and Colleen Kattau.
Gerardo Mosquera and David Craven (Translator) and Colleen Kattau (Translator)
Art and Revolution in Latin America, 1910–1990
In this uniquely wide-ranging book, David Craven investigates the extraordinary impact of three Latin American revolutions on the visual arts and on cultural policy. The three great upheavals — in Mexico (1910–1940), in Cuba (1959–1989), and in Nicaragua (1979–1990) — were defining moments in twentieth-century life in the Americas. Craven discusses the structural logic of each movement’s artistic project — by whom, how, and for whom artworks were produced — and assesses their legacies. In each case, he demonstrates how the consequences of the revolution reverberated in the arts and cultures far beyond national borders.

The book examines not only specific artworks originating from each revolution’s attempt to deal with the challenge of “socializing the arts,” but also the engagement of the working classes in Mexico, Cuba, and Nicaragua with a tradition of the fine arts made newly accessible through social transformation. Craven considers how each revolution dealt with the pressing problem of creating a “dialogical art” — one that reconfigures the existing artistic resource rather than one that just reproduces a populist art to keep things as they were. In addition, the author charts the impact on the revolutionary processes of theories of art and education, articulated by such thinkers as John Dewey and Paulo Freire. The book provides a fascinating new view of the Latin American revolutionaries — from artists to political leaders — who defined art as a fundamental force for the transformation of society.
Print publication date July 2002 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300082111
EISBN 9780300234343
Illustrations 193 illus.
Print Status out of print