Howard R. Lamar
Howard R. Lamar is Sterling Professor of American History Emeritus at Yale University.
Lamar, Howard R.
Lamar, Howard R.
United States of America
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Description: Discovered Lands, Invented Pasts: Transforming Visions of the American West
In her perceptive chapter “ ‘Curious Historical Artistic Data’: Art History and Western American Art,” Nancy K. Anderson quotes Henry Tuckerman, an early chronicler of American art, as saying: “It is in our...
PublisherYale University Art Gallery
PublisherYale University Press
Description: Discovered Lands, Invented Pasts: Transforming Visions of the American West
A common theme of western American art—from the depictions of Indians by early explorers to the monumental landscapes of Albert Bierstadt to the vibrant images of Georgia O’Keeffe—is the transformation of the land through European-American exploration and resettlement. In this book, leading authorities look at western American art of the past three centuries, reevaluating it from the perspectives of history, art history, and American studies.

Jules David Prown begins the book by discussing the need for interdisciplinary approaches to broaden the study of western American art. Nancy K. Anderson then calls for a reconsideration of western art as art rather than documentation and for the adoption of new methods to probe its aesthetic, historical, political, and cultural complexities. William Cronon explores what an environmental historian might learn from American landscape art, concluding that each image must be read as a multilayered view intertwining past, present, and future within a larger context of progress and expansionism. Examining representations of American Indians, Brian W. Dippie finds that early works pictured them caught in a process of dramatic change while later artists showed them frozen outside of time: when the frontier ended, western art made nostalgia its defining characteristic. Martha A. Sandweiss argues that the ways in which views of the American west and its peoples reached nineteenth-century audiences—through large-edition prints, book illustrations, or theatrical exhibitions—significantly affected both the images and the meanings attached to them. Susan Prendergast Schoelwer challenges popular perceptions of the frontier as a womanless domain, discovering abundant pictures of Native American women in the art of the western fur trade. Howard R. Lamar concludes by discussing the changing perceptions of western artists and inhabitants of their region’s landscape in the twentieth century.
Print publication date May 1992 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300057225
EISBN 9780300234312
Illustrations 132 illus.
Print Status out of print
Description: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: American Art from the Yale University...
In the fall of 1773, James Boswell and Dr. Samuel Johnson embarked on a tour to the Hebrides in Scotland. On their way they spent two days at Armadale on the Isle of Skye, waiting for a favorable wind for their vessel to carry them northward. While at Armadale, Boswell wrote:
PublisherYale University Art Gallery
PublisherYale University Press