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Andrew Hemingway
Andrew Hemingway is Professor Emeritus in History of Art at University College London.
Hemingway, Andrew
Hemingway, Andrew
United States of America
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Description: Landscape Imagery and Urban Culture in Early Nineteenth-Century Britain
Britain in the early nineteenth century, then the most advanced bourgeois society, saw the emergence of a new type of landscape painting, distinguished by its modern imagery and innovative naturalism. The transition was not straightforward; painters were faced with the problem of representing modern life within the landscape tradition, a tradition centred on the pastoral and the picturesque. It is the various methods by which artists negotiated this problem that provides the focus for this study. Andrew Hemingway interprets landscape painting of this period as an essentially urban phenomenon and demonstrates the ways in which painters sought to incorporate images of modern life into the tradition of landscape painting. Works by Turner, Constable and Crome, as well as many lesser known artists, are placed within the context of the London exhibition scene and the social world of the metropolis. Different class attitudes towards art and towards landscape painting in particular are explored through an analysis of contemporary art theory and criticism. The author draws upon the topographical literature of the period, as well as on poetry and social history, to illustrate his extensive account of landscape imagery: the seaside resort, the river and other scenes of modern leisure.
Print publication date August 1992 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780521391184
EISBN 9780300247398
Illustrations 125
Print Status out of print
Description: Artists on the Left: American Artists and the Communist Movement 1926–1956
This remarkable book is the first to examine in abundant detail the relation between visual artists and the American Communist movement during the twentieth century. Andrew Hemingway charts the rise and decline of the Communist Party’s influence on art in the United States from the Party’s dramatic rise in prestige during the Great Depression to its effective demise in the 1950s. Offering a full account of how left-wing artists responded to the Party’s various policy shifts over these years, Hemingway shows that the Communist Party exerted a powerful force in American culture, even after the Nazi-Soviet Pact of 1939.

The author scrutinizes the works of an array of leftist artists, many of great interest but largely forgotten today. He demonstrates that American art produced within the Communist Party’s orbit was far more diverse and had a much more complex relationship with modernism than has been previously understood. Refusing to march in lockstep to Party requirements, artists and critics in and around the Party accepted no single aesthetic line and engaged in heated debates. Hemingway offers radical new interpretations of some familiar works, reassesses the role of the John Reed Clubs and the work of artists in the federal art programs, and revises accepted thinking about art in the United States during the Cold War. In short, he offers a distinguished and original political history that recovers the rich artistic and intellectual legacy of the American left.
Print publication date October 2002 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300092202
EISBN 9780300247015
Illustrations 193
Print Status in print