Amanda Vickery
Amanda Vickery is Professor in Early Modern History at Queen Mary, University of London.
Vickery, Amanda
Vickery, Amanda
United States of America
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Description: Gender, Taste, and Material Culture in Britain and North America, 1700–1830
​I​N AUGUST 1799, Dr. Thomas Ferris of the Deanery, Battle, in Sussex, wrote to the London wallpaper and decorating firm Trollope and Sons, having seen some paper at the architect-designed mansion of a local friend...
Author
John Styles (Editor), Amanda Vickery (Editor)
PublisherYale Center for British Art
PublisherPaul Mellon Centre
Description: Gender, Taste, and Material Culture in Britain and North America, 1700–1830
HISTORIES OF MATERIAL LIFE have boomed over the last decade. Books about commodities—nutmeg, salt, aniline dyes, cod, porcelain, glass—have repeatedly appeared on best-seller lists.Giles Milton, Nathaniel’s Nutmeg: How One Mans Courage Changed the Course of History (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1999); Mark Kurlansky, Salt: A World History (New York: Walker, 2002); Simon Garfield, Mauve: How One Man Invented a Colour That Changed the World (London: Faber and Faber, 2000); Kurlansky, Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World (London: Cape, 1998); Janet Gleeson, The Arcanum: The Extraordinary True Story of the Invention of European Porcelain (London: Bantam, 1998); Alan Macfarlane and Gerry Martin, The Glass Bathyscaphe (London: Profile, 2002). Academic research into fields as far apart as Renaissance art history and twentieth-century urban geography have been transformed by investigations that employ the notion of consumption as their conceptual point of...
Author
John Styles (Editor), Amanda Vickery (Editor)
PublisherYale Center for British Art
PublisherPaul Mellon Centre
Description: Gender, Taste, and Material Culture in Britain and North America, 1700–1830
John Styles (Editor), Amanda Vickery (Editor)
Between 1700 and 1830, men and women in the English-speaking territories framing the Atlantic gained unprecedented access to material things. The British Atlantic was an empire of goods, held together not just by political authority and a common language, but by a shared material culture nourished by constant flows of commodities. Diets expanded to include exotic luxuries such as tea and sugar, the fruits of mercantile and colonial expansion. Homes were furnished with novel goods, like clocks and earthenware teapots, the products of British industrial ingenuity. This groundbreaking book compares these developments in Britain and North America, bringing together a multi-disciplinary group of scholars to consider basic questions about women, men, and objects in these regions. In asking who did the shopping, how things were used, and why they became the subject of political dispute, the essays show the profound significance of everyday objects in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal*
Author
John Styles (Editor), Amanda Vickery (Editor)
Print publication date February 2007 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300116595
EISBN 9780300256710
Illustrations 89
Print Status out of print
Description: Mrs. Delany and Her Circle
The gentlewoman Mary Delany is familiar to any student of the decorative arts, since she combined a diverse art practice with voluminous opinionated correspondence. For all her familiarity, however, Delany is worth revisiting, for as a...
Author
PublisherYale Center for British Art
PublisherYale University Press