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List of illustrations

  • Feast of the Rose Garlands, detail
  • Portrait of Giovanna Tornabuoni
  • Ulysses and Iro
  • Medal of Emperor John VIII Palaeologus, obverse and reverse
  • Portrait of Giovanna Tornabuoni, detail
  • Ghent Altarpiece (Adoration of the Mystic Lamb), detail
  • Letter of 26 June 1425, detail of handwriting
  • Seated Boy Drawing
  • Letter of 26 August 1484 to Lorenzo "the Magnificient" de' Medici, detail of handwriting
  • Nativity
  • Sinopia for the Marriage of Isaac and Rebecca
  • Young Knight in a Landscape
  • St John the Evangelist
  • Lybian Sybil
  • Decorative motif
  • Creation of the World
  • Entombment
  • Battle of the Nudes
  • Adam and Eve
  • Abduction of the Sabine Women
  • Apollo Belvedere
  • Seated Boy Drawing
  • Studies of nude and draped figures
  • Studies of drapery
  • Study of drapery
  • Study for the drapery of the Virgin in a "Visitation"
  • Fluting Marsyas
  • Study of a nude man seen from front, side, and back
  • Studies of casts of feet
  • The "Academy" of Baccio Bandinelli
  • House of Mantegna, groundplan
  • Portrait of a Young Man (Self-portrait?)
  • Weisskönig in a Painter's Workshop
  • Bust of Faustina the Elder
  • Letto di Policleto, replica
  • Belvedere Torso
  • Drawings after an "Adonis" sarcophagus (Codex Wolfegg, fols 34v–35r)
  • Self-Portrait from the Tomb of Andrea Mantegna
  • Cenotaph of Filippo Brunelleschi
  • Floor tomb of Fra Angelico
  • Cenotaph of Fra Filippo Lippi
  • Tomb of Hans Stethaimer
  • Tomb of the Pollaiuolo brothers
  • Tomb of Andrea Bregno
  • Risen Christ
  • Virgin and Child with SS Peter, Paul, Lawrence, and Francis
  • Chapel of St John the Baptist, view of interior decorations
  • Tomb of Raphael
  • Emperor Maximian, detail of frieze
  • Medal of Francesco I da Carrara, obverse and reverse
  • Medal of Francesco Novello da Carrara, obverse and reverse
  • Sketch of "Diva Faustina" and other studies, detail
  • Medallion of Emperor Nero, obverse and reverse
  • Medallion of Empress Faustina, obverse and reverse
  • Medallion of Constantine
  • Four Roman Tombs
  • St James before Herod Agrippa
  • Drawings after classical sculpture (Codex Vallardi, 2397v)
  • Study after the Quirinal Horsetamers
  • Study after a Trajanic relief
  • Study after a torso of Venus
  • Marcus Aurelius
  • Study after the Marcus Aurelius
  • Study after a Trajanic relief
  • Agony in the Garden, detail: townscape
  • Emperors Claudius and Nero
  • Codex Escurialensis: Decorative grotesques (fol. 58)
  • Studies after the Domus Aurea decorations
  • Studies after the Domus Aurea decorations
  • Apollo Belvedere
  • Bust of Marcus Aurelius
  • Marsyas
  • Muse of Philiskos
  • Belvedere Torso
  • Jupiter (fragment)
  • Study after "Jupiter" and detail (Codex Wolfegg, fol. 46v)
  • Study after "Jupiter" and detail (Codex Wolfegg, fol. 46v)
  • Study of Roman ruins
  • Christ among the Doctors
  • Story of Isaac
  • The Ascension with Christ Giving the Keys to St Peter
  • Judith and Dido
  • St Sebastian, detail
  • Introduction of the Cult of Cybele in Rome
  • Forge of Vulcan
  • Portrait of a Woman: La Schiavona
  • The Pastoral Concert
  • Title page of Gozzoli sketchbook
  • Sonnet and self-portrait sketch
  • Portrait of a Poet
  • Discovery of Honey
  • Battle of Love and Chastity
  • Marriage of Alexander and Roxana
  • Virgin and Child with Angels
  • Virgin and Child (central panel of polyptych), detail
  • Birth of Venus
  • Venus Anadyomene
  • Calumny of Apelles
  • Calumny of Apelles
  • Calumny of Apelles
  • Triumph of Galatea
  • Feast of the Gods
  • Worship of Venus
  • Worship of Venus
  • Hunt of Meleager
  • Bacchanal of the Andrians
  • Annunciation, detail: self-portrait
  • Self-portrait
  • Self-portrait, detail
  • Assumption of the Virgin, detail: St Thaddeus
  • Portrait of the Artist as David
  • Journey of the Magi, detail of self-portrait
  • Self-portrait
  • Self-portrait
  • Self-portrait in a Convex Mirror
  • Portrait of Giovanni(?) Arnolfini and His Wife, detail
  • Self-portrait, detail
  • Portrait of a Man (Self Portrait?)
  • Self-portrait, detail
  • The Artist and His Wife
  • The Artist and His Wife
  • Self-portrait at the Age of Thirteen
  • Self-portrait as a Goldsmith
  • Self-portrait with Eryngium
  • Self-portrait medal
  • Adoration of the Magi
  • Adoration of the Magi, detail
  • Self-portrait bust
  • Self-portrait with Federigo da Montefeltro
  • Self-portrait medal, obverse and reverse
  • Self-Portrait
  • Self-portrait with Workshop Assistants
  • Self-portrait medal, obverse and reverse
  • Self-portrait medal, obverse and reverse
  • Expulsion of Joachim, detail
  • Self-portrait
  • Self-portrait
  • Self-portrait
  • St Sebastian
  • Flagellation
  • Jesus among the Doctors
  • Vision of St. Eustace
  • Adam and Eve
  • Melencolia I
  • St. Jerome in His Study
  • Flagellation
  • Battle of the Sea Gods
  • Massacre of the Innocents
  • Eleven Nude Figures
  • A Prisoner Led Before a Judge
  • Triumphal Procession of Bacchus
  • Saint Jerome in His Study
  • St George
Free
Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
Table of Contents
PublisherYale University Press
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.001
Free
Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
Early on in my academic career I tended to encourage in my students the view that early Renaissance painters and sculptors were essentially artisans in outlook. Painters were apprenticed, I suggested, and experienced in the craft practices commended by Cennino Cennini in his Craftsman’s Handbook. They had little time or inclination to engage with ideas that circulated in the world beyond the confines of their workshops. Indeed, the need, in Leon Battista Alberti’s view, for painters to be …
PublisherYale University Press
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.002
Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
By the time that Baldassare Castiglione wrote this passage in his celebrated Book of the Courtier (Il cortigiano), perhaps as the book reached completion around 1516–18, painters and sculptors had become skillful in many fields of intellectual life. Indeed, the point had been reached when painting and sculpture could justifiably be numbered with the ‘liberal arts’ and no longer graded merely as ‘mechanical arts’. Castiglione’s close friend Raphael himself had by that date …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.1-15
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.003

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Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
King of Naples until he was ousted by Alfonso of Aragon in 1443, René d’Anjou held a high reputation as a painter. In his Cronaca rimata the Urbino court painter Giovanni Santi wrote that ‘in our time the aged King René / Painted better than many who are famous’, citing him as an example comparable with painters of high social status recorded in classical times. Another example is Baldassare d’Este, the Ferrarese painter and medallist, if he was indeed, like Duke Borso d’Este, an …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.17-60
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.004

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Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
During the early Renaissance, shifts in attitudes towards the artist affected both his social status and the extent to which he was valued as an intellectual. The favoured court artist in the early fifteenth century might be made a valet de chambre or a familiaris, the title bestowed, for example, on Pisanello by Gianfrancesco Gonzaga of Mantua in 1439. This position gave him a somewhat higher standing within court society than that of other artisans, a position from which he could …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.61-87
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.005

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Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
Early Renaissance artists had various opportunities during their lifetimes to enhance their social and intellectual position, and some took advantage of these whenever possible. Their final opportunity came after death, in the form of a visible commemoration. In fact, however, few tombs or commemorative monuments to Renaissance artists survive, although we have evidence of others. It appears from this evidence that over the course of the early Renaissance monuments to artists gradually became …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.89-108
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.006

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Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
Roberto Weiss introduced The Renaissance Discovery of Classical Antiquity (1969) as ‘a history of classical archaeology in its early stages, showing … how it was developed by the enthusiasm and industry of countless humanists … [for] the concrete legacy of classical antiquity’. Renaissance artists played a part in this process of archaeological investigation and discovery. Some artists recognised the pursuit of archaeology as a route towards fulfilling their intellectual aspirations. They …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.109-140
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.007

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Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
This chapter and the following three offer discussions of aspects of the relationships between early Renaissance images and art-theoretical and other texts. The principal issue that runs through these discussions is: in what ways did the Renaissance artist respond to written texts, or engage with theoretical or intellectual questions relevant to his art practice that were also discussed in writings of the time? Issues raised in early Renaissance art theory have been extensively discussed in the …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.141-161
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.008

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Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
The paragone between painting and sculpture was an issue that increasingly concerned Renaissance writers on art. Whether a painting could communicate expressive meaning as effectively and as affectingly as a poem had, however, been a recurrent theme in intellectual debate from at least the time of Dante. In his celebrated comment on Giotto’s new ascendancy over Cimabue in Purgatorio XI, Dante makes a clear comparison between these two painters and the two great poets of …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.163-176
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.009

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Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
Much of Cennino Cennini’s Craftsman’s Handbook reflects the recipe-book mentality of the late medieval artisan painter. Nevertheless, Cennino already articulated an awareness of the painter’s inventive powers, believing that he was entitled to some licence in his interpretation of his subjects. The word invenzione (invention) does not find a place in Cennino’s vocabulary, but he recognised the role of the imagination – fantasia – in artistic production. It is the exercise of …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.177-187
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.010

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Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
The fresco of the Marriage of Alexander and Roxana (fig. 89), painted by Sodoma for Agostino Chigi’s bedchamber in the Villa Farnesina in Rome, is based on Lucian’s description of a painting by Apelles that celebrated this episode in the life of his patron Alexander the Great. Distantly based on a drawing by Raphael, the work was fairly certainly completed to coincide with Chigi’s marriage on 28 August 1519, under pressure from Pope Leo X, to his Venetian mistress, Francesca Ordeaschi …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.189-207
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.011

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Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
‘Through painting’, Alberti wrote in On Painting, ‘the faces of the dead go on living for a very long time’. But in their self-portraits early Renaissance artists, it seems, intended less to commemorate themselves for posterity than to assert in visual form their artistic and intellectual skills. The ways in which the Renaissance artist portrayed himself are therefore useful indicators of his self-image and aspirations. The context in which he sets himself, the clothes he is wearing, the …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.209-243
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.012

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Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
Renaissance artists sometimes produced works intended primarily to serve as demonstration pieces. They may have wished to display both their skills in technique and craftsmanship, and their intellectual concerns and abilities. A noteworthy example of this type of work, from the very end of our period, is Parmigianino’s Self-portrait in a Convex Mirror (fig. 112). Vasari writes that Parmigianino took this panel, and others, with him to Rome, where Pope Clement VII and his court were …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.245-270
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.013

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Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
The category of paintings here called ‘display pieces’ indicates what artists considered were significant about their own talents. They wished others, and perhaps especially potential patrons, to realise that these were the particular pictorial characteristics and qualities that they could offer. But what did others in the societies within which the Renaissance painter moved think of them? This concluding chapter will review some of the evidence that indicates how the Renaissance artist was …
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.271-279
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.014

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Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
Bibliography
PublisherYale University Press
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.015

Access to this content is only available to subscribers. If you are at an institution that currently subscribes to the A&AePortal, please login to your VPN before accessing the site. If you have already purchased an individual subscription, please sign in to your account to access the content. Learn more about subscriptions.

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Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
Photograph Credits
PublisherYale University Press
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.016
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Description: The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
Index
PublisherYale University Press
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00147.017
The Intellectual Life of the Early Renaissance Artist
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