Paul Mellon Centre
Description: Paul Mellon Centre
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Paul Mellon Centre
Paul Mellon Centre
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WC1B 3JA
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
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Description: Modern Life & Modern Subjects: British Art in the Early Twentieth Century
In May 1914 the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London opened its exhibition of “Twentieth-Century Art.” The catalogue identified four main strands in modern painting but included a fifth group of Jewish artists, hung in the “Small Gallery.” In this illuminating book art historian Lisa Tickner takes a fresh look at the work of artists from each of these strands. In a series of innovative case studies, combining analysis with substantial new research, she examines the artists’ radical approaches to the process of painting and their resources in the defining conditions of modern life.

Tickner discusses Walter Sickert’s Camden Town Murder and L’Affaire de Camden Town in the context of tabloid crime. Augustus John’s Lyric Fantasy is seen as rooted in, but also as qualifying, the Edwardian fascination with gypsies and tramping while memorializing John’s dead wife, Ida. The studies for Wyndham Lewis’s lost Kermesse are connected to popular dance and to his sense of the "wild body." Vanessa Bell’s Studland Beach is related to the emergence of the beach as a social and psychic space and to childhood summers in St. Ives drawn on by her sister, Virginia Woolf, in To the Lighthouse. And David Bomberg’s In the Hold, along with Mark Gertler’s Jewish Family, is shown to emerge from contemporary debates surrounding Jewish art and the possibility of a secular, urban, Yiddish culture. In an extended Afterword, Tickner considers the interplay between modernism and modernity in British art before 1914.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal.*
Print publication date June 2000 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300083507
EISBN 9780300271928
Illustrations 153
Print Status in print
Description: Slavery, Sugar, and the Culture of Refinement: Picturing the British West Indies,...
This highly original book asks new questions about paintings and prints associated with the British West Indies between 1700 and 1840, when the trade in sugar and slaves was most active and profitable. In a wide-ranging study of scientific illustrations, scenes of daily life, caricatures, and landscape imagery, Kay Dian Kriz analyzes the visual culture of refinement that accompanied the brutal process by which African slaves transformed “rude” sugar cane into pure white crystals.

In these works refinement is usually associated with the metropole, and “rudeness” with the colonies. Many artists capitalized on those characteristics of rudeness—animality, sensuality, and savagery—that increasingly became associated with all the island inhabitants. Yet other artists produced works that offered the possibility of colonial refinement, not just economic profit and sexual pleasure, thus complicating perceptions of difference between the two sides of the Atlantic.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal.*
Print publication date August 2008 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300140620
EISBN 9780300270204
Illustrations 117
Print Status in print
Description: The Genius of Robert Adam: His Interiors
Robert Adam was one of the greatest British architects of the later eighteenth century. So widespread was his influence as a decorator and furniture designer that his name has become a household word. But it is the synthesis of architecture, planning, and decoration that stands at the heart of Adam’s achievement, as Eileen Harris shows in this enlightening book. She considers in detail the interaction of each of these elements in nineteen of Adam’s most accomplished interior projects, including some of the most famous British country houses and London town houses.

Most of Adam’s enormous body of work was in preexisting houses; the challenges of remodeling stimulated his inventive imagination, and he became a master at turning awkward situations to advantage. Harris has mined archival sources, including the large collection of drawings from the Adam office at Sir John Soane’s Museum in London, and fully examined the houses themselves to discover exactly what Adam did in each project and why. In her detailed discussions of the planning, decoration, ceilings, carpets, chimney pieces, and furniture of such interiors as those at Kedleston, Syon House, Osterley Park, Newby Hall, Culzean Castle, and Home and Lansdowne Houses in London, Harris uncovers the full extent of Adam’s prodigious achievements.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal.*
Print publication date November 2001 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300081299
EISBN 9780300267518
Illustrations 506
Print Status out of print
Description: Reynolds: Portraiture in Action
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00296
A deeply researched and elegantly written study on Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723–1792)—Georgian England’s most celebrated portraitist and the first president of the British Royal Academy of Arts—this invaluable volume explores all aspects of Reynolds’s portraiture. Mark Hallett provides detailed, compelling readings of Reynolds’s most celebrated and striking works, investigating the ways in which they were appreciated and understood in his own lifetime. Recovering the artist’s dynamic interaction with his sitters and patrons, and revealing the dramatic impact of his portraits within the burgeoning exhibition culture of late-eighteenth-century London, Hallett also unearths the intimate relationship between Reynolds’s paintings and graphic art.

Reynolds: Portraiture in Action offers a new understanding of the artist’s career within the extremely competitive London art world and takes readers into the engrossing debates and controversies that captivated the city and its artists.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal.*
Print publication date September 2014 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300196979
EISBN 9780300267631
Illustrations 431
Print Status out of print
Description: Angelica Kauffman: Art and Sensibility
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00255
One of the most successful and internationally celebrated artists of the eighteenth century, Angelica Kauffman (1741–1807) established her reputation with sensitive portraits as well as ambitious history paintings. This major study explores the artist’s work and career by considering how Kauffman reconciled the public and presumed masculine pursuit of painting with her role as woman artist and arbiter of private taste.

Author Angela Rosenthal analyzes Kauffman’s pictorial strategies and her significant contribution to portraiture as a field of representation, including detailed discussion of the artist’s extraordinary series of self-portraits. Featuring a wealth of new information, this illustrated book demonstrates Kauffman’s role in shaping European visual culture, shedding new light on the history of women artists and on art history as a critical discipline.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal.*
Print publication date May 2006 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300103335
EISBN 9780300264517
Illustrations 161
Print Status out of print
Description: Victorian Sculpture
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00267
In this first comprehensive survey of a previously neglected field, Read presents a wide-ranging account of the British sculpture of the nineteenth century, placing it in the context of the lives and working conditions of the sculptors themselves. In the process, he illuminates an astonishingly diverse selection of sculpture, from well-known monuments to works that have long been virtually forgotten.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal.*
Print publication date September 1982 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300025064
EISBN 9780300263152
Illustrations 480
Print Status out of print
Description: William Henry Fox Talbot: Beyond Photography
Mirjam Brusius (Editor), Katrina Dean (Editor), Chitra Ramalingam (Editor)
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00251
William Henry Fox Talbot (1800–1877) was a British pioneer in photography, yet he also embraced the wider preoccupations of the Victorian Age—a time that saw many political, social, intellectual, technical, and industrial changes. His manuscripts, now in the archive of the British Library, reveal the connections and contrasts between his photographic innovations and his investigations into optics, mathematics, botany, archaeology, and classical studies.

Drawing on Talbot’s fascinating letters, diaries, research notebooks, botanical specimens, and photographic prints, distinguished scholars from a range of disciplines—including historians of science, art, and photography—broaden our understanding of Talbot as a Victorian intellectual and a man of science.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal.*
Author
Mirjam Brusius (Editor), Katrina Dean (Editor), Chitra Ramalingam (Editor)
Print publication date October 2013 (in print)
Print ISBN 9780300179347
EISBN 9780300263244
Illustrations 114
Print Status in print
Description: The English Print: 1688–1802
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00242
Before the invention of photography, prints were the principal means for reproducing and disseminating visual information. The engraver did for the image what the printer did for the written word, and painters were compared and judged on the evidence of prints of their work. In this authoritative and innovative book, Timothy Clayton describes the growth of the print trade in England during the eighteenth century, a period during which Britain emerged from artistic obscurity to dominate the international print market.

This highly readable account offers a fascinating tour of the principal outlets for prints in London, the provinces, and the British colonies over a period of more than one hundred years. Clayton considers the variety of published material history prints, topography, portraiture, satire, propaganda—the channels of distribution, and the various audiences to which prints were addressed. He examines the effect of the sudden and dramatic influx of foreign prints in the second decade of the eighteenth century and traces the way in which English engravers and printsellers attempted to establish a national industry. Prints were used to promote English entertainments, luxury industries, landscapes, gardens, and paintings and to demonstrate the increasing wealth and sophistication of the English nation. Their influence over the commercialization of leisure and the development of luxury manufacturing was considerable. By the 1760s, British engravers and painters were winning recognition and establishing a new reputation on the Continent through the dissemination of their work. During the following decade, the enthusiasm for English prints developed into full-blown anglomania, and engraved scenes from English literature and national history were displayed on walls throughout Europe.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal.*
Print publication date December 1997 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300066500
EISBN 9780300260564
Illustrations 304
Print Status out of print
Description: German Romanticism and English Art
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00229
This original study sets out to investigate and analyze the reactions of English artists in the four decades following the end of the Napoleonic Wars. The period was a critical one: despite the brilliant achievements of Turner, Constable, and Lawrence, there was a growing uneasiness about the "sensuous" direction taken by the British School as a whole. After years of isolation due to the wars with France, British artists became aware of striking new developments in continental art, culminating in the 1840s when German monumental painting was held up as a model for the competitions for the decoration of the new Houses of Parliament.

The first part of the book considers the principal areas of artistic contact between the two countries, the radical new developments in the field of aesthetics, and the new range of themes found in German Romanticism. The latter half looks at specific stylistic connections, the impact of German book illustration and design, the influence of the Munich school on history painting, and the rivalry between English and German artists in the field or religious art.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal*
Print publication date September 1979 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300021943
EISBN 9780300259490
Illustrations 176
Print Status out of print
Description: Gender, Taste, and Material Culture in Britain and North America, 1700–1830
John Styles (Editor), Amanda Vickery (Editor)
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00205
Between 1700 and 1830, men and women in the English-speaking territories framing the Atlantic gained unprecedented access to material things. The British Atlantic was an empire of goods, held together not just by political authority and a common language, but by a shared material culture nourished by constant flows of commodities. Diets expanded to include exotic luxuries such as tea and sugar, the fruits of mercantile and colonial expansion. Homes were furnished with novel goods, like clocks and earthenware teapots, the products of British industrial ingenuity. This groundbreaking book compares these developments in Britain and North America, bringing together a multi-disciplinary group of scholars to consider basic questions about women, men, and objects in these regions. In asking who did the shopping, how things were used, and why they became the subject of political dispute, the essays show the profound significance of everyday objects in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal*
Author
John Styles (Editor), Amanda Vickery (Editor)
Print publication date February 2007 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300116595
EISBN 9780300256710
Illustrations 89
Print Status out of print
Description: Learning to Draw: Studies in the Cultural History of a Polite and Useful Art
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00189
As early as the sixteenth century, drawing in England came to be seen as something more than an activity exclusive to artists—it became a polite and useful art, a practice of everyday life. This generously illustrated book explores the social and cultural processes that enabled drawing to emerge as an amateur pastime, as well as the meanings that drawing had for people who were not artists. Ann Bermingham shows how the history of drawing in England—from the age of Elizabeth I to the era of early photography—mirrored changes in society, politics, the practical world, and notions of self.

The book examines how drawing intersected with a wide range of social phenomena, from political absolutism, writing, empirical science, and Enlightenment pedagogy to nationalism, industrialism, tourism, bourgeois gentility, and religious instruction. Bermingham discusses the central role of drawing and the visual arts in Renaissance debates about government and self-government, then considers the relations between seventeenth-century drawing, natural science, and the masculine ideal of the honest gentleman. She also investigates landscape drawing in the context of eighteenth-century views on sensibility; the emergence of the amateur draftsman and the accomplished woman; and the commercialization of amateur drawing in the nineteenth century. The book concludes with a discussion of the impact of photography on the social practice of drawing.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal*
Print publication date March 2000 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300080391
EISBN 9780300254662
Illustrations 270
Print Status out of print
Description: English Art and Modernism 1900–1939
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00188
This critically acclaimed book is both a detailed history of the development of modern art in England in the early twentieth century and a study of the evolution of the concept of modernism among English artists, critics, and theorists.

Charles Harrison explores the two main phases of modern art activity during the period: the years before and during the First World War, when the principal factions were Sickert's Camden Town Group, the English Post-Impressionists, and the Vorticists; and the 1930s, when a new avant garde assembled in response to recent developments in European art, only to divide into groupings of abstract artists, Surrealists, and Realists. Harrison discusses the artists of the period, the most important individual works, and the writings of the critics, resulting in a major contribution to knowledge about the art and theory of modernism.

*This eBook is available exclusively on the A&AePortal*
Print publication date May 1994 (out of print)
Print ISBN 9780300059861
EISBN 9780300254914
Illustrations 165
Print Status out of print
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