List of illustrations

  • Another Triumph of Free Speech
  • Fascisti Finance
  • Workers Unite
  • Untitled
  • May Day
  • Spring
  • Not on Your Tintype
  • Save That Nordic Strain
  • Adam n' Eve
  • Rot Front
  • Untitled
  • Untitled
  • Untitled
  • One Must Have the Courage to Deliver Europe from the Bolshevist Plague
  • Prost Noske! The Young Revolution is Dead
  • Social-Democracy
  • Refugees
  • The Eternal City
  • Where Next?
  • The Little People
  • Guernica
  • Those Who Always Pay
  • Untitled
  • Lost Horizon
  • Europe's Winter Parade
  • The Best Answer to Race Persecution
  • Flight from Fascist Terror in Almeria
  • Refugees
  • Untitled
  • Winter
  • Y aún no se van! (And Still They Don't Go!)
  • The Invaders
  • The New Order
  • Jack-in-the-Box
  • Monstra della rivoluzione fascista, cover
  • Another Classic Bust Unearthed in Greece
  • Waterfront Demonstration
  • Drawing for Art Front cover
  • Composition
  • History of Communications
  • Untitled (Municipal Broadcasting Company, WNYC, Studio B)
  • Hot Still-Scape for Six Colors — 7th Avenue Style
  • Eggbeater No. 2
  • Eggbeater No. 2 (Hot Still-scape)
  • Ultra-marine
  • Ultramarine, detail study
  • Parson Weems' Fable
  • Father I Can Not Tell a Lie: I Cut the Tree
  • The Artist in His Museum
  • Venus and Adonis
  • Bäuerliche Venus
  • Fighting the Tories—1776–1937
  • The Delaware for Them—The Atlantic for Us
  • Bundles for Britain
  • The Return of Private Davis from the Argonne
  • Parade to War: Allegory
  • The Light of the World
  • Sowers
  • Again
  • Starry Night
  • Indifference
  • Casualty
  • Harvest
  • Invasion
  • Exterminate
  • Our Good Earth, Keep It Ours
  • The Farm Is a Battleground, Too
  • Achelous and Hercules
  • Homeless in Poland
  • Out of Darkness
  • Partisans
  • The Defenders
  • Boy from Stalingrad
  • Keep 'Em Flying
  • Civilians
  • All in a Day's Work
  • Souvenir of Lidice
  • Bomber
  • Murder
  • Paul Bunyan
  • Untitled
  • Fascist Company
  • Good and Evil
  • Three Men on a Horse
  • War-Mad
  • Italian Landscape II: Europa
  • We Fight for a Free World!
  • Pacific Landscape
  • Concentration Camp
  • Italian Burial Society
  • Italian Landscape
  • The Red Stairway
  • Liberation
  • Home
  • Produce for Victory!
  • Witch Hunt
  • Second Allegory
  • Rape of Persephone
  • Sacrifice of Iphigenia
  • Tiresias
  • Antigone
  • Hands of Oedipus
  • Omen of the Eagle
  • Alphabet of Terror, or, Eyes of Oedipus
  • Expectation of Evil
  • The Red Bird
  • Leda and the Swan
Free
Description: Antifascism in American Art
Contents
PublisherYale University Press
Free
Description: Antifascism in American Art
Illustrations
PublisherYale University Press
Free
Description: Antifascism in American Art
In many respects this book, like the antifascist struggle in art that it discusses, was a collaborative effort supported by a variety of institutions. Generous grants from Stanford University, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution greatly facilitated the research and writing of the manuscript. During the year I spent in Washington, D.C., as a fellow at the National Museum of American Art, a number of historians and art historians commented constructively on my ideas; …
PublisherYale University Press
Description: Antifascism in American Art
The American artistic response to fascism was not a single, uniform movement. Between 1933 and 1945 artists ranging from members of New York radical circles to painters from the heartland of the United States reacted against fascist repression abroad and at home. Together they erected political organizations that otherwise might never have existed and under the auspices of which they planned innumerable antifascist activities. At the same time, antifascist politics assumed a variety of pictorial …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Antifascism in American Art
During the 1920s the American artistic response to fascism was all but nonexistent. From 1922, when Benito Mussolini established his dictatorship in Italy, until Adolf Hitler came to power in Germany in 1933, the communist political newspaper the Daily Worker published only a few topical illustrations in which the massive figure of Mussolini consistently appeared asserting absolutist political control. The New Masses, which began publication in 1926 and became the best-known American communist …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Antifascism in American Art
In William Gropper’s Refugees (ca. 1937, fig. 17), an anonymous peasant group crosses a barren landscape in slow procession. This painting, completed at the height of the Popular Front, forms a dramatic contrast to the antifascist illustrations dating from the early thirties, especially those by Gropper himself. Gone are the simple dichotomies with the worker-heroes vanquishing the fascist-villains: Refugees neither promises ultimate victory to the people nor explicitly condemns the fascist …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Antifascism in American Art
In Stuart Davis’s painting now entitled Artists Against War and Fascism (1936, fig. 37), two bulky soldiers outfitted in dark green military uniforms, one of them swinging a black billy club, grasp a prisoner between them. Their victim slumps helplessly, a white sack spotted with blood covering his head. An interrogation lamp hanging from a cord stretches across the top of the canvas and illuminates a section of barbed wire on the ground. Scattered across the landscape, and surrounding the …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Antifascism in American Art
The regionalist artists Thomas Hart Benton, John Steuart Curry, and Grant Wood did not belong to the American Artists’ Congress, nor did they participate in the numerous artistic and political activities organized on behalf of Spain during the Popular Front. These artists resided in the Midwest, removed from the leftist political fervor concentrated in New York City; they appeared far more concerned with developing an indigenous American art than with addressing international political events. …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Antifascism in American Art
From Pearl Harbor until the end of the Second World War, a number of American social-realist artists documented the fight against fascism from the viewpoint of the communist Left. However, a series of traumatic and disillusioning events at the end of the thirties—the 1939 Nazi-Soviet nonaggression pact, the 1939 Russian invasion of Poland, and the Russian defeat of Finland in 1940—had greatly diminished the ranks of American liberal and leftist artists committed to the Soviet Union. Each shift …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Antifascism in American Art
The few public statements issued jointly by Mark Rothko and Adolph Gottlieb in the early forties make it abundantly clear that the Second World War affected their thinking about art. They suggested on several occasions that their paintings related to the turbulence of their times. It is therefore tempting to point out a correspondence between their mythic imagery—which mingles references to Greco-Roman tragedies with a surrealist style—and the violence of the war. Neither artist, however, went …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Antifascism in American Art
During the thirties and early forties, American painters with often widely divergent political beliefs and esthetic practices enlisted their art in the conflict between democracy and fascism. They developed a variety of stylistic devices and rhetorical strategies to respond to fascism, even though both contemporary and subsequent critical literature often reduced that multiplicity to a clear-cut choice between propaganda and modern art. Certainly, the question of whether artists had a greater …
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Antifascism in American Art
Bibliography
PublisherYale University Press

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Description: Antifascism in American Art
Index
PublisherYale University Press
Antifascism in American Art
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